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Diploma in Computer Science and Information Technology MAKERERE UNIVERSITY Target Group COMPUTING AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE Proposal MAKERERE UNIVERSITY
FACULTY OF COMPUTING AND
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE
Proposal for the revision of the Diploma in Computer Science
and Information Technology Program
June 2009
1
Contents
1 Introduction 4
2 The Need for Revision 4
3 The Program 5
3.1 Nature of the Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
3.2 Duration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
3.3 Tuition Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
3.4 Target Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
4 Regulations 5
4.1 Admission requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
4.2 Weighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
4.3 Semester Load and Minimum Graduation Load . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
4.4 Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
4.5 Grading and Pass mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
4.6 Progression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
4.7 Retaking a course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
4.8 Degree Classification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
4.9 Discontinuation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
5 The Revised Curriculum 8
5.1 Knowledge Areas in the Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
5.2 Course outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
5.2.1 Computer Science Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
5.2.2 Information Technology Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
5.3 New and Old Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
6 Detailed Curriculum 11
6.1 Semester I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
6.1.1 CSC 1100: Computer Literacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
6.1.2 CSK 1101: Communication Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
6.2 DCS 1103: Gender and ICT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
6.2.1 DCS 1107 Fundamentals of Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
6.3 Semester II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
6.3.1 CSC 1204: Research Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
6.3.2 DCS 1205: Programming Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
6.3.3 DCS 1207: Fundamentals of Website Design . . . . . . . . . . 19
6.3.4 DCS 1204: Fundamentals of Database Systems . . . . . . . . . 20
2
6.4 Year I Recess Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
6.4.1 CSC 1301: Practical Skills Development . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
6.4.2 CSC 1303: Cisco Certified Network Associate (Audited) . . . 21
6.5 Semester III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
6.5.1 CSC 1104: Computer Organization & Architecture . . . . . . 21
6.5.2 CSC 1105: Numerical Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
6.5.3 CSC 1106: Programming Methodology I . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
6.5.4 DCS 2103: Ethics in an IT Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
6.6 BIT 1102 Communications Technology & Internet . . . . . . . . . . . 26
6.7 BIT 1104: Information Technology I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
6.8 Semester IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
6.8.1 CSC 1206: Computational Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
6.8.2 CSC 1207: Programming Methodology II . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
6.8.3 CSC 1208: Individual Project I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
6.8.4 CSC 1209 Logic Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
6.9 BIT 1204 Information Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
6.10 BIS 1200 Information Systems in Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
6.11 BSE 1205 Introduction to Internet Programming . . . . . . . . . . . 40
7 Resources and Infrastructure 42
7.1 Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
7.2 Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
7.3 Lecture Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
7.4 Computer Laboratories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
7.5 Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
7.6 Library Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
8 Quality Assurance 43
8.1 Feedback from students enrolled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
8.2 Class meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
8.3 Use of ICT in availing lecture materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
8.4 Peer review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
8.5 External examiners’ reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
8.6 Industrial Training placement reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
8.7 Tracer studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
3
1 Introduction
The Faculty of Computing and Information Technology, Makerere University runs a
two year undergraduate Diploma in Computer Science and Information Technology.
It was first introduced in 2003 and revised in 2005. The revised curriculum took
effect in 2005/2006 academic year. It targets A’level leavers, Diploma holders and
Certificate holders. It is a day and evening privately sponsored program.
The main objectives of the program is develop personnel with theoretical and
practical skills through hands on training in Computer Science and Information Tech-
nology who will be able to provide high quality technical support in computerized
organizations.
The program is run jointly by the Department of Computer Science and Depart-
ment of Information Technology. On top of overseeing the day to day running of the
program, the departments explore ways of improving the quality of the program so
as to achieve its objectives.
The Department of Computer Science and Department of Information Technology
- Faculty of Computing and Information Technology therefore seeks to revise the
curriculum of the Diploma in Computer Science and Information Technology.
2 The Need for Revision
Due to the changing trends in the Computing, there is a need to continuously re-
vise Computing curricula to be able to equip students with the current skills. The
Department of Computer Science has proposed a revision in the Bachelor of Science
in Computer Science. Likewise, the Department of Information Technology has also
proposed a revision in Bachelor of Information Technology. By design, the Diploma
in Computer Science and Information Technology has to provide all the content in
the first year of the respective undergraduate program (distributed in two years).
This is because the graduates of the diploma can enroll and proceed to the second
year of the degree programs. The revision of the B.Sc (Computer Science) and BIT
makes the existing curricula unable to cover all the content in the first year of the
bachelor’s programs. The revised diploma curriculum caters for this so that graduates
with good grades in the diploma can be able to proceed to the second year of the
respective revised undergraduate programs.
Further more, the proposed revision of the curriculum caters for improvement in
the practical competences of the graduates. Since Diploma graduates are expected
to give operational support in IT departments in the organizations, the curriculum
has been beefed up with more core practical course units to give the students the
relevant skills. At the same time, theoretical courses on the set up and management
4
of IT departments/organizations have been included.
3 The Program
3.1 Nature of the Program
The program is day and evening. It is an entirely privately sponsored program.
3.2 Duration
The duration of the program shall be two academic years consisting of four semesters
and two recess terms. Each semester lasts seventeen (17) weeks two of which are for
examinations.
3.3 Tuition Fees
Tuition fees for privately sponsored students shall be 1,500,000 Uganda Shillings per
year for Ugandans and 2,250,000 Uganda Shillings per year for non Ugandans. This
is the same tuition fees for the existing curriculum.
3.4 Target Group
The revised program targets A-level leavers and Certificate holders.
4 Regulations
4.1 Admission requirements
To be admitted to the Diploma in Computer Science and Information Technology, a
candidate must satisfy the general admission requirements for Makerere University.
In addition, the following conditions apply:
(a) Certificate Holders:
candidates seeking admission through the certificate holders scheme must:
• Have passed Mathematics and English with at least a credit in the Uganda
Certificate of Education or its equivalent
• Have at least a credit certificate in computer science or related discipline
from a recognized institution
5
(b) Direct Entry:
Candidates seeking admission through direct entry must:
• Have passed Mathematics and English with at least a credit in the Uganda
Certificate of Education or its equivalent
• Have at least two principle passes at the same sitting in UACE in any
of the following subjects:- Mathematics, Physics, Economics, Chemistry,
Biology, Geography, Entrepreneurship, Technical Drawing and Fine Art.
• A minimum weighted point set by Makerere University Admissions board
For purposes of computing weighted points, the A’ level subjects shall be grouped
and weighted as follows:-
Group Weight Subjects
Essential 3 Any two best done of the above subjects
Relevant 2 The third done of the above subjects
Desirable 1 General Paper, Subsidiary Mathematics
1
Others 2
All others
4.2 Weighting
The weighting unit is the Credit Unit (CU). The Credit Unit is a contact hour per
week per semester. A contact hour is equal to (i) one lecture hour (LH), (ii) two
practical hours (PH) or (iii) two tutorial hours (TH)
4.3 Semester Load and Minimum Graduation Load
The normal semester load is between 15 and 24 credit units. The minimum graduation
load is 60 credit units.
4.4 Assessment
Assessment is to be done by progressive assessments (like tests, assignments, group
work) during the semester and final examination. The final examination may be
purely written, purely practical or having a written and practical component. Pro-
gressive assessments constitute 40% of the final score and the final examination will
constitute 60%.
6
4.5 Grading and Pass mark
Grading will be based on the final score for each examination using the ranges bellow
Final Letter Grade Grade Point
90-100 A+ 5
80- 89 A 5
75- 79 B+ 4.5
70- 74 B 4
65- 69 C+ 3.5
60- 64 C 3
55- 59 D+ 2.5
50- 54 D 2
45- 49 E+ 1.5
40- 44 E- 1
0 - 39 F 0
A student with a grade point greater or equal to 2 (letter grade D) in a certain
course unit is considered to have passed the course unit.
4.6 Progression
A student is considered to be under normal progression if he/she has a grade point
of at least 2 in all the courses that make up his/her full semester load. A student
is under probational progression if he/she has at least a course unit in his/her full
semester load where the grade point is less than 2.
4.7 Retaking a course
A student will retake every course from which he/she obtains a grade point less than
2
4.8 Degree Classification
The degree will be classified using the cumulative grade point average (CGPA)
i=n i=n
CGP A = GPi × CUi ÷ CUi
i=1 i=1
where GP and CU represent grade points and Credit units respectively.
The degree will be classified in accordance with the table below
7
CLASS CGPA
First Class 4.40 - 5.00
Second Class - Upper Division 3.60 - 4.39
Second Class - Lower Division 2.80 - 3.59
Pass 2.00 - 2.79
4.9 Discontinuation
A student will be discontinued from the program if
• Fails to complete the program in five years
• Fails a course unit three times
• Has a CGPA of less than 2 for three consecutive semesters
5 The Revised Curriculum
5.1 Knowledge Areas in the Curriculum
The curriculum caters for 6 knowledge areas which are:
1. Theoretical Computing and IT
2. Computer Repair and maintainance
3. Network set-up and Management
4. Web Design/Development
5. Software Development
6. Soft skills
Knowledge area 1 and 6 are aimed at giving students knowledge and skills to be
able to help them proceed for further advanced studies as well general real life skills
at a work place (like communication). Knowledge skills 2, 3, 4 and 5 are to provide
students with practical skills that will enable them offer technical support in IT firms.
8
5.2 Course outline
5.2.1 Computer Science Option
Code Name CU LH PH TH CH
Semester I: (5 Courses)
CSC 1100 Computer Literacy 4 30 60 – 60
CSK 1101 Communication Skills 4 45 30 – 60
DCS 1103 Gender and ICT 3 45 – – 45
DCS 1107 Fundamentals of Mathematics 3 30 – 30 45
DCS 1108 Computer Assembly, Repair and Maintainance I 3 30 30 – 45
Total 17
Semester II: (5 Courses)
CSC 1204 Research Methodology 3 30 – 30 45
DCS 1205 Programming Fundamentals 3 45 – – 45
DCS 1206 Computer Assembly, Repair and Maintainance II 3 30 30 – 45
DCS 1207 Fundamentals of Web site Design 3 30 30 – 45
DCS 1208 Fundamentals of Database Design 3 30 30 – 45
Total 15
Year I Recess Term: (2 Courses)
CSC 1301 Practical Skills Development 4 – 120 – 60
CSC 1303 Cisco Certified Network Associate(Audited) 5 150 100 – 200
Total 9
Semester III: (5 courses)
Cores: (4 core courses)
CSC 1104 Computer Organization & Architecture 4 60 – – 60
CSC 1105 Numerical Methods 3 45 – – 45
CSC 1106 Programming Methodology I 3 30 30 – 45
DCS 2103 Ethics in an IT Environment 3 45 – – 45
Electives (1 elective course)
BIT 1102 Communication Technology & The Internet 3 45 – – 45
BIT 1104 Information Technology I 3 45 – – 45
Total 16
Semester IV: (5 Courses)
Cores: (4 core courses)
CSC 1206 Computational Mathematics 4 45 – 30 60
CSC 1207 Programming Methodology II 4 30 60 – 45
CSC 1208 Individual Project I 4 15 90 – 60
CSC 1209 Logic Programming 3 30 30 – 45
Electives (1 elective course)
BIT 1204 Information Management 4 45 30 – 60
BIS 1200 Information Systems in Business 9 3 45 – – 45
BSE 1205 Introduction to Internet Programming 4 45 30 – 60
Total 18
5.2.2 Information Technology Option
Code Name CU LH PH TH CH
Semester I
CSC 1100 Computer Literacy 4 30 60 – 60
CSK 1101 Communication Skills 4 45 30 – 60
DCS 1103 Gender and ICT 3 45 – – 45
DCS 1107 Fundamentals of Mathematics 3 30 – 30 45
DCS 1108 Computer Assembly, Repair and Maintainance I 3 30 30 – 45
Total 17
Semester II
CSC 1204 Research Methodology 3 30 – 30 45
DCS 1205 Programming Fundamentals 3 45 – – 45
DCS 1206 Computer Assembly, Repair and Maintainance II 3 30 30 – 45
DCS 1207 Fundamentals of Web site Design 3 30 30 – 45
DCS 1208 Fundamentals of Database Design 3 30 30 – 45
Total 15
Year I Recess Term
CSC 1301 Practical Skills Development 4 – 120 – 60
CSC 1302 CCNA Sem. I & II (Audited) 5 150 100 – 200
Total 9
Semester III
BIT 1102 Communication Technology & The Internet 4 30 60 – 60
BIT 1104 Information Technology I 4 45 30 – 60
CSC 1106 Programming Methodology I 3 30 30 – 45
DCS 2103 Ethics in an IT Environment 3 45 – – 45
Semester IV (1 elective)
CSC 1104 Computer Organization & Architecture 4 60 – – 60
CSC 1105 Numerical Methods 3 45 – – 45
Total 17
Semester IV (Core)
CSC 1207 Programming Methodology II 4 30 60 – 45
BIT 1204 Information Management 4 45 30 – 60
BIS 1200 Information Systems in Business 3 45 – – 45
BSE 1205 Introduction to Internet Programming 4 45 30 – 60
Semester IV (1 elective)
CSC 1206 Computational Mathematics 4 45 – 30 60
CSC 1208 Individual Project I 4 15 90 – 60
CSC 1209 Logic Programming 3 30 30 – 45
Total 18
10
5.3 New and Old Courses
Code Comment
CSC 1100 Old
CSK 1101 Old
DCS 1103 Old
DCS 1107 New
DCS 1108 New
CSC 1204 Old
DCS 1205 New
DCS 1206 New
DCS 1207 New; Enhanced DCS 2102
DCS 1208 New; Enhanced DCS 1204
CSC 1301 Old
CSC 1302 Old
BIT 1102 Old
BIT 1104 New
CSC 1106 New; Enhanced CSC 1200
DCS 2103 New
CSC 1104 New, Enhanced CSC 1100
CSC 1105 Old
CSC 1207 New, Enhanced CSc 1202
BIT 1204 Old
BIS 1200 Old
BSE 1205 New
CSC 1206 New; Enhanced CSC 1102, CSC 1201
CSC 1208 New
CSC 1209 New
6 Detailed Curriculum
6.1 Semester I
6.1.1 CSC 1100: Computer Literacy
(a) Description
In this course, students are to learn about the basic organization, concepts
and terminologies in a computerized environment. They are also to get an
in depth understanding of common computer applications. The use of related
applications in different operating systems will be explored.
11
(b) Aims
The aims of the course unit are to:
• Equip students with basic knowledge about computer organization;
• Equip students with skills of using common office applications;
• Expose students to different operating systems;
• Equip students with skills of how to use the Internet and
• Equip students with knowledge about common text editors in different
operating systems.
(c) Learning outcomes
By the end of the course unit, the student should be able to:
• Describe the different parts of a computer;
• Describe the historical evolution of computers;
• Competently use the common office applications in at least two operating
systems;
• Competently use common text editors in at least two operating systems.
(d) Teaching and learning pattern
Teaching will be by lectures and laboratory demonstrations/practicals
(e) Indicative content
• General computer organization
• Historical perspectives of computing
• Common Microsoft office packages
• Office packages in other operating systems
• Text editors
• Common Linux commands
• Using the web
(f) Assessment method
The assessment will be in form of tests and assignments (40%) and final written
exam (60%)
(g) Reading list
12
(i) Computer Literacy by John Preston, Robert Ferrett and Shelly Gaskin,
2007.
(ii) Practical Computer Literacy by Jelne Janrich and Dan Oja, 2001
6.1.2 CSK 1101: Communication Skills
(a) Description
This course povides students with skills of effective communication. These
include verbal, written, and gestual. The course aims at facilitating students
appropriately and clearly communicate with others.
(b) Aims
The aims of the course are:
• Improve the communication competencies of the students;
• Improve problem solving strategies of students;
• Improve the art of critical thinking within the student;
• Improve the student’s ability to collect and synthesize information;
• Provide students with knowledge to utilise the library and other educa-
tional resources.
(c) Teaching and Learning Pattern
Teaching and Learning will be by classroom lectures, demonstration and stu-
dents practical projects
(d) Indicative Content
• Writing Skills:
Thinking critically/ selectively before the writing process; Selecting the
relevant details; Organising the relevant details logically; Writing the re-
ports essays, letters and taking notes in appropriate register; Avoiding am-
biguities, fallacies, irrationalities; Providing supportive evidence; Editing
documents, proof reading; Writing and expanding informa- tion; Quoting
and citing references; Writing a curriculum vitae.
• Reading Skills:
The use of skimming; scanning inference and prediction in reading; Inten-
sive and critical reading; Acquisition of specific reading skills; Interpreta-
tion of non linear texts; Locating information and comprehension.
13
• Speaking and Listening Skills to Enhance E.ffective Public Relations:
The art of persuasion in e.effective speaking; Conducting interviews; Con-
ducting meetings; Participating in group discussions and tutorials; Non
verbal communication crues; Presentation semi-nars, seeking clarification
etc.; Expression of politeness; Public speaking; Proper listening skills.
• Examination Skills Preparing for examinations
How much one gets from group discussions; Proper revision; Understanding
examination rubric; Budgeting time during examination process; Writing
examinations and following instructions.
(e) Assessment Method
Assessment will be in form of coursework and tests (40%) and written examna-
tion (60%)
(f) Reading List
(i) 101 ways to improve your communication skills instantly, by Bennie Bough,
4th Edition, 2005
(ii) The hard Truth About soft skills: Work Place Lessons Smart People wish
they had learned sooner, by Peggy Klavs, 2008
6.2 DCS 1103: Gender and ICT
(a) Description
This course tackles the concepts of gender and how it affects / is affected by
the Information and Communication Technologies. The course covers organiza-
tional, individual and technological aspects of the relationship between gender
and ICT.
(b) Aims
By the end of the course, students should be able to understand the social,
organizational and technological underpinings of gender and how they affect/
are affecyed in the ICT environment.
(c) Teaching and Learning Pattern
Teaching and learning will be in terms of lectures and class presentations
(d) Indicative Conent
• Introduction to Gender and ICT
• Gender and Technology
14
• Use of ICTs in addressin addressing gender equality
• Gender and ICTs: mapping the change
• ICTs as tools to challenge gender inequality
• ICTs as tools to promote empowerment
• Guidelines to gender sensitive policy making
(e) Assessment Method
Assessment will be in terms of tests and assigments (40%) and final examination
(60%)
(f) Reading List
• Society and Gender: An Introduction to Sociology by G. Lupton, P M
Short and R Whip, Macmillan, 1992.
• Gender and the Information Revolution in Africa by Eva Rathgehen and
Edith Ofwona Adena 2000
6.2.1 DCS 1107 Fundamentals of Mathematics
(a) Course Description:
This course introduces basic mathematics to the students. It lays foundation
for further mathematics and its applications in the course. it helps the student
bridge high school mathematics to the mathematics required at university level.
(b) Aims:
The aim of the course is to give students a strong mathematical foundation in
order to comprehend further mathematical applications of computer science in
the program
(c) Learning Outcomes:
On completion of this course unit, the students will be able to:
• Perform basic and intermediate differentiation
• Perform basic and intermediate intergration
• Demonstrate adequate knowledge of trogonometry
• Be able to solve simple systems of linear equations
• Demonstrate knowledge of geometry
(d) Teaching and learning pattern:
Teaching will be by lectures and class discussions
15
(e) Indicative content:
• Differentiation: Gradient of a curve, chain rule, products and quotients,
implicit differentiation, products and quotients, rates of change.
• Intergraction: Basic intergration, change of variables, intergration by in-
spection, intergration by parts.
• Trigonimetry: Trigonometric curves, compound and half angle fomulae,
derivatives of trigonometric functions:
• Systems of linear equations: Solution by elimination, substitution and
crammer’s rule
• Geometry: Equation of lines, planes, intersection of lines and lines, lines
and planes and planes and planes
(f) Assessment method:
Assesment will be by tests and assignments (40%) and final examination (60%)
(g) Reference Books:
(i) Pure Mathematics I by Backhouse, J K and S P T Houldsworth , Longmans
Press, 2005
(ii) Pure Mathematics II by Backhouse, J K and S P T Houldsworth , Long-
mans Press, 2005
6.3 Semester II
6.3.1 CSC 1204: Research Methodology
(a) Description
The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with types of scientific re-
search relevant for anyone working in the field of computer science. It will
enable students to develop capacity to conduct small, simple research projects
while at the university.
(b) Aims
The aims of this coures unit are to:
• Enable students become competent in understanding the research process;
• Provide skills that will enable students undertake independent research
using a variety of appropriate methods, using primary and secondary data,
as well as qualitative and quantitative techniques;
16
• Provide students with skills to produce a research proposal;
• Highlight ethical research practices to students.
(c) Learning outcomes
By the end of the course, students will be:
• Capable in their chosen professional, vocational or study areas to conduct
research;
• Able to contribute in an entrepreneurial and innovative way within their
business, workplace or community in the field of research;
• Able to operate effectively and ethically in conducting research in groups/teams
• Adaptable and manage change to handle different research situations ac-
cording to different contexts;
• Aware of research and research methodology in subsequent years of study.
(d) Intellectual, Practical and Transferable skills
At the end of the course, students should have the ability to demonstrate:
• Appreciation of the different functions and applications of scientific re-
search in the field of computer science;
• Basic knowledge of the different research methodologies relevant for com-
puter science;
• Knowledge of which methods to use in what circumstances;
• Knowledge of what a research proposal entails;
• Application of quantitative and qualitative research methods and tech-
niques;
• Judgment of the quality of research proposals as well as the products (ar-
ticles, papers, theses etc.) of scientific research.
(e) Teaching and Learning Pattern
Teaching will be in form of formal lectures, tutorials and seminars. Classes will
be interactive and students are expected to come to class prepared to participate
and contribute regularly to class activities and discussions.
(f) Indicative Content
The content of this course will include:
• Introduction to scientific research;
• Formulating and clarifying the research topic and research problem;
17
• Conducting a literature review;
• Different research approaches;
• Ethics in research;
• Sampling;
• Use of secondary data;
• Collection methods for primary data;
• Analyzing qualitative data;
• Analyzing quantitative data and writing a research proposal and project
report.
(g) Assessment method
The course will be assessed by course work and tests (40%) and final examina-
tion (60%)
(h) Reading lists:
• Cooper, H. (1998). Synthesizing Research: A Guide for Literature Re-
views. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications.
• Saunders, M, Lewis, P & Thornhill, A (2003), Research Methods for Stu-
dents, 3rd edn, UK, Financial Times, Prentice Hall.
6.3.2 DCS 1205: Programming Fundamentals
(a) Description:
The course gives students the fundamentals of programming. Students learn
program flow, control as well as selected procedures using pseudocodes. Flow
chats are used to conceptualise the flow and syntax of the operations.
(b) Aims:
The aim of the course is to give students a conceptual view of the art of pro-
gramming and program controls so that they are able to competently implement
programming projects in specific languages.
(c) Teaching and Learning Patterns:
Teaching will be by lecturing and class presentations
(d) Indicative Content:
• Program structure
18
• Variables and declarations
• Program controls
• Searching and sorting
• Functions and procedures
• Searching and sorting
(e) Assessment Method:
Assessment will be by tests and assignments (40%) and final written examina-
tion (60%)
(f) Reading List:
(i) Foundations of Algorithms Using C++ Pseudocode, Second Edition by
Richard E. Neapolitan Richard E. Neapolitan, Kumarss Naimipour. Jones
& Bartlett Publishers, 1998.
6.3.3 DCS 1207: Fundamentals of Website Design
(a) Description:
This course aims to provide an understanding of the basics of the Internet, how
it originated, how it works,and how to develop and maintain Web sites using
HTML editors and site management tools such as FrontPage and/or Dream
weaver.
(b) Aims:
The primary aim of this course is to provide a basic understanding of Internet
related technologies and introductory skills in Web applications.
(c) Teaching and Learning Patterns:
Teaching will be in terms of class lectures and labaratory demonstrations
(e) Indicative Content:
• Introduction to basic Internet Technologies such as DNS, email services,
LDAP and the HTTP protocol.
• Web lay out and presentation
• Website development development.
• Dynamic websites and content management
• Trends in web technologies
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(f) Assessment Method:
Assessment will be n form of tests and practical assignments (40%) and final
written examination (60%)
(g) Reading List:
• Learning Web Design: A Beginner’s Guide to (X)HTML, StyleSheets, and
Web Graphics by Jennifer Niederst Robbins and Aaron Gustafson, O’Reilly
Media, 2007.
6.3.4 DCS 1204: Fundamentals of Database Systems
(a) Description:
This course give students skills in the design and development of databases
together with database applications. The course caters for design as well as
scripting skills.
(


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