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CURRICULUM
OF
ENGLISH
For
BA (04 YEARS HONORS)
& MA (02 YEARS HONORS)
(Revised 2006)
HIGHER IS ION
S
EDUCATION COMM
HIGHER EDUCATION COMMISSION
ISLAMABAD
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 1 of 95
CURRICULUM DIVISION, HEC
Prof. Dr. Syed Altaf Hussain Member (Acad/R&D)
Prof. Dr. Altaf Ali G. Shaikh Former Adviser (Acad/R&D)
Dr. Soofia Mumtaz Adviser (Acad)
Malik Ghulam Abbas Deputy Director
Miss Ghayyur Fatima Deputy Director (Curri)
Mr. M. Tahir Ali Shah Assistant Director
Mrs. Noshaba Awais Assistant Director
Mr. Shafiullah Khan Assistant Director
Composed by Mr. Zulfiqar Ali, HEC Islamabad
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 2 of 95
CONTENTS
1. Introduction 6
2. BA (Honors):
• Aims and Objectives 11
• Scheme of Studies 12
• Courses in Detail 14
3. MA (Honors) Literature:
• Aims and Objectives 51
• Scheme of Studies 52
• Courses in Detail 53
4. MA (Honors) Applied Linguistics:
• Aims and Objectives 68
• Scheme of Studies 69
• Courses in Detail 70
5. Recommendations 93
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 3 of 95
PREFACE
Curriculum of a subject is said to be the throbbing pulse of a nation. By
looking at the curriculum one can judge the state of intellectual
development and the state of progress of the nation. The world has
turned into a global village; new ideas and information are pouring in
like a stream. It is, therefore, imperative to update our curricula regularly
by introducing the recent developments in the relevant fields of
knowledge.
In exercise of the powers conferred by sub-section (1) of section 3 of
the Federal Supervision of Curricula Textbooks and Maintenance of
Standards of Education Act 1976, the Federal Government vide
notification no. D773/76-JEA (Cur.), dated December 4, 1976,
appointed University Grants Commission as the competent authority to
look after the curriculum revision work beyond class XII at bachelor
level and onwards to all degrees, certificates and diplomas awarded by
degree colleges, universities and other institutions of higher education.
In pursuance of the above decisions and directives, the Higher
Education Commission (HEC) is continually performing curriculum
revision in collaboration with universities. According to the decision of
the special meeting of Vice-Chancellors’ Committee, curriculum of a
subject must be reviewed after every 3 years. For the purpose, various
committees are constituted at the national level comprising senior
teachers nominated by universities. Teachers from local degree
colleges and experts from user organizations, where required, are also
included in these committees. The National Curriculum Revision
Committee for English in its meeting held in May 22-24, 2006 at the
HEC Regional Centre, Lahore revised the curriculum after due
consideration of the comments and suggestions received from
universities and colleges where the subject under consideration is
taught. The final draft prepared by the National Curriculum Revision
Committee duly approved by the Competent Authority is being
circulated for implementation by architectural institutions.
(PROF. DR. ALTAF ALI G. SHAIKH)
Adviser (Acad/R&D)
August 2006
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 4 of 95
CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
STAGE-I STAGE-II STAGE-III STAGE-IV
CURRI. UNDER CURRI. IN DRAFT FINAL STAGE FOLLOW UP
CONSIDERATION STAGE STUDY
COLLECTION OF APPRAISAL OF 1ST PREP. OF FINAL QUESTIONNAIRE
REC DRAFT BY EXP. OF CURRI.
COL./UNIV
CONS. OF CRC. FINALIZATION OF INCORPORATION COMMENTS
DRAFT BY CRC OF REC. OF V.C.C.
PREP. OF DRAFT APPROVAL OF PRINTING OF REVIEW
BY CRC CURRI. BY V.C.C. CURRI.
Abbreviations Used: IMPLE. OF BACK TO
CRC. Curriculum Revision Committee CURRI. STAGE-I
VCC. Vice-Chancellor’s Committee
EXP. Experts
COL. Colleges
UNI. Universities
ORIENTATION
PREP. Preparation COURSES
REC. Recommendations
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 5 of 95
INTRODUCTION
The second and final meeting of National Curriculum Revision Committee in
English (NCRC - English) 2005-06 was held from May 22-24, 2006 at the
Higher Education Commission (HEC) Regional Centre, Lahore. The following
twenty-five experts drawn from various national and regional universities
participated and shared their expertise:
CONVENER: Dr. Nasim Riaz Butt, Eminent Professor (HEC)
University of Education, Lahore.
MEMBERS: Dr. M. Shahbaz Arif, Professor and Chairperson
University of Sargodha,
Sargodha.
Dr. Fauzia Shamim, Professor
Institute of Education,
The Aga Khan University, Karachi
Rao Jalil, Professor
University of Management & Technology,
Lahore
Ms. Amberina M. Kazi, Professor
Department of English,
University of Karachi,
Karachi
Kaleem Raza Khan, Professor and Chairperson,
University of Karachi,
Karachi
Prof. Zakia Sarwar
Chairperson, NCE, SPELT House- 206
New Kausar Square Town,
Karachi
Dr. Rubina Kamran, Head of Department,
National University of Modern Languages (NUML),
Islamabad
Mrs. Rakhshanda Siddiq, Associate Professor
Government College for Women,
Gulberg, Lahore
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 6 of 95
Ms. Shireen Rahim, Assistant Professor,
University of the Punjab,
Lahore
Mr. Mushtaq ur Rehman, Assistant Professor,
Gomal University,
Dera Ismail Khan
Mr Ghulam Ali Buriro, Assistant Professor
Department of English,
Sindh University,
Jamshoro
Mr. Ghulam Mustafa Mashori, Assistant Professor,
Shah Abdul Latif University,
Khairpur
Mr. Naveed Ahmad, Assistant Professor,
Bahaud-din Zakaria University (BZU),
Multan.
Ms. Moona. A. Kidwai, Assistant Professor and
Chairperson,
Jinnah University for Women, Nazimabad,
Karachi
Mr. Malik Ajmal Gulzar, Lecturer,
Allama Iqbal Open University,
Islamabad
Hafiz Abid Masood, Lecturer,
International Islamic University,
Islamabad
Mr Ahmed Zeeshan Gul, R.A.
Baluchistan University of Information Tech & Management
Sciences, Samungli Road,
Quetta
SECRETARY: Dr. Waseem Anwar, Professor & Former Chairperson
Department of English, G C University (GCU)
Lahore
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 7 of 95
The following members could not attend the final meeting due to their
academic preoccupation. They participated in the first meeting held
December 26-28, 2005:
Dr. Fawzia Afzal-Khan, Professor
Department of English, Montclair State University (MSU)
New Jersey (NJ), USA;
Foreign Faculty Member
G C University (GCU),
Lahore
Dr Fawzia Afzal-Khan of Montclair State University (MSU), New Jersey, USA,
has worked as the Foreign Expert/ Advisor for the NCRC – English 2005-06.
Her review of the first draft served as a guideline for adapting the suggestions
and to practically bridge gaps between the national and international
demands.
Sultan Mahmood Niazi, Professor and Director
Languages, Baluchistan University of Information Tech. &
Management Sciences, Samungli Road,
Quetta
Dr. Fehmida Sultana, Head of Department
University of Central Punjab, Gulberg,
Lahore
Mr. Safdar Ali, Associate Professor,
Forman Christian College (A Chartered University),
Lahore.
Ms. Nabeela Kiani, Associate Professor,
G C University (GCU),
Lahore
Dr. Furrukh Khan, Assistant Professor,
Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS),
Lahore.
The first day meeting on May 22, 2006 started with recitation from the
Holy Quran. Senior Research Officer, Higher Education Commission,
Islamabad thanked the members on behalf of Dr. Atta-ur Rehman, Chairman,
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 8 of 95
HEC and Dr. Altaf Ali G. Sheikh, Director R & D Academics, HEC. The
members were briefed about the minutes of the first meeting and major
objectives of the HEC – NCRC 2005-06. One of the targeted items on
agenda was to design curriculum for 04 yrs BA (Honors) in English and 02
yrs MA (Honors) in English literature and linguistics in the light of the needs
of the universities at national level. The details about the required credit
hours and contact hours were forwarded in shape of a handout stating that in
a 04 yrs BA program the students will focus on the core university
requirement in the first two yrs and on the specialized courses for completion
of a major in the final two yrs. In a typical 04 yrs undergraduate program the
total credits required vary from 124 – 136, each year consisting of two
semesters. The students therefore complete the requirements of eight
semesters. In the context of apprehensions expressed by members about
the existing 02 yrs BA, it was decided that if there were a need the
universities would take decision to start parallel programs or offer remedial
courses according to their available resources.
Emphasizing on the key term “Change,” the Convener of the
Committee Prof. Dr. Nasim Riaz Butt reiterated the importance of plans in the
light of quality assurance and the rules to be followed. He commended the
spirit of the members to share expertise and introduce very positive change
that would be congenial, flexible, and adaptable for all the various national
and regional universities and their affiliated colleges in Pakistan. Prof. Dr.
Waseem Anwar, Secretary of the Committee, also voiced the importance of
autonomy, exploration and experimentation to balance tradition with talent,
signifying the combined role of literatures written in English language for
promoting human values. This initiated further discussion among the experts
for reviewing the courses designed in the first meeting in the light of feedback
from various corners (including the guiding remarks by Dr. Fawzia Afzal-
Khan, the Foreign Expert/ Advisor from MSU, NJ, USA). Based on the
feedback and discussion on it, in terms of ground reality and future vision, the
Committee then subdivided into “Literature” and “Language” groups to focus
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 9 of 95
on their expertise and finalize the draft for the HEC-NCRC – English 2005-06.
The Committee decided to highlight the aims and objectives of the document
and make strong recommendations for its recognition. Some details of these
recommendations are given near the end of this document, not be ignored
but be considered as the beginning of a new chapter towards
implementation. In this context the scheme of studies for a sequential
learning, from easy to difficult and from core to specific or specialized areas,
along with general aims and objectives for each of the programs have been
incorporated within the document.
On the whole, during the meeting each member of the Committee
participated with enthusiasm and did their best to produce the best. The
members pooled-in their resources, books, course outlines,
recommendations, advisory notes, skills, constraints, genuine concerns, and
above all their sincere involvement. The Committee however appreciates in
particular the efforts made by Prof. Kaleem Raza, Dr. Fauzia Shamim, Dr.
Shahhbaz Arif, Prof. Amberina Kazi, Dr. Farrukh, and Ms. Mona Qidwai to
assist the Committee with their computational skills. It is requested that by
taking this document as a balanced sample and not a perfect or foolproof
model the Committee expects that the readers will ignore gaps, as there must
be some, and pick on the gist. The Committee is thankful to the HEC for
coordinating this whole event.
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 10 of 95
BA (HONORS) ENGLISH – 04 YEARS PROGRAM
MAJOR AIMS & OBJECTIVES
General and Specific Aims:
• To encourage the learners to enjoy the wider range of reading
• To orientate the learners to the tradition of writings in English
After completion of the 04 yrs BA (Honors) program, the learners will be able
to:
1. Display substantial proficiency in oral and written English
2. Demonstrate knowledge of the core linguistic and literary concepts
and their various applications
3. Enhance their employability in various fields, such as media,
communication, teaching, competition exams, and other relevant
fields
Objectives:
In specific, the learners shall also be able to:
1. Develop confidence, independence, and ability to reflect
2. Express ability to respond and interpret effectively
3. Use critical concepts and terminology with understanding
4. Analyze individual texts and explore comparison between them
5. Appreciate the significance of social and historical context
6. Trace and recognize the cross cultural influences
As a result, the learners shall be assessed for:
1. Clear communication and presentation
2. Detailed understanding and comprehension
3. Independent opinions and creative ideas
4. Responsible research and academic growth
5. Good impression and polite behavior
Signatures:
Prof. Dr. Waseem Anwar Prof. Dr. Nasim Riaz Butt
(Secretary) (Convener)
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 11 of 95
SCHEME OF STUDIES FOR BA (HONS) 04-YEARS PROGRAM
Year Credit Compulsory/ Minor/ Core Major
(CH) Requirement Elective
Max Total 124 – 24 18 24 64 – 70
CH 136
Used Total 130 24 18 24 64
CH
Year I
Semester I 15 • Foundations of Minor I • Introduction to
English – I Literature – I
• Pakistan (Essays and
Studies Short Stories)
• Introduction to
Linguistics – I
Semester II 15 • Foundations of Minor I • Introduction to
English – II Literature – II
• Islamic Studies (Drama and
Poetry)
• Introduction to
Linguistics – II
Year 2
Semester III 15 • Communicatio Minor II • Forms of Poetry
n Skills • Contemporary
• Urdu Issues in Applied
Linguistics – I
Semester IV 15 • Academic Minor II • Readings in
Reading and Drama and Novel
Writing • Contemporary
• Citizenship Issues in Applied
Education Linguistics – II
(Human
Rights)
Year 3
Semester V 15 Minor III • Psycholinguistics
• Sociolinguistics
• Principles of
Literary Criticism
• Historical Survey of
English Literary
Tradition (16th to
late 19th century)
Semester VI 15 Minor III • Critical Approaches
to Literature
• Major Literary
Movements (the
20th century)
• English Phonology
• Lexical Studies
Year 4
Semester 16 • TESOL – I • Introduction to
VII • Introduction to Research
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 12 of 95
Research Methodology
Methodology (Literature)
(Applied • Classics in Novel
Linguistics) • Classics in Drama
• Internship/ • South Asian
Practicum Literature
• Pedagogical
Grammar
Semester 16 • Syllabus and • Internship (literary
VIII Materials Pedagogy and
Development Practicum)
• Language • General survey of
Assessment American Lit.
• Research paper • Classics in Poetry
(08 CH) • Research Paper (04
CH)
KINDLY NOTE THE FOLLOWING:
• The above given course details in the “Scheme of Studies” for BA
(Hons) 04 Yrs program is basically a guideline. Given the need for
major, core and required or compulsory courses, the universities can
offer their own options/ alternates in the light of this given guideline.
• As per the HEC document the semester-wise course codes or course
numbering begins with 100 to 800 series. The universities may consult
the document and adopt or assign the codes accordingly or as per the
local/ regional requirements.
• Also, in the HEC given proposal in general for the BA (Hons) 04 Yrs
program students decide the major after two years. However, if the
universities apprehend difficulties about the existing 02 yrs BA
programs, they may design and offer optional/ remedial courses
according to their available resources.
• Each course in the above given “Scheme of Studies” is a 03 credit
hours (CH) course except in the final year where they are 04 CH per
course. The universities can also offer 04 CH courses in Year 03 or
keep them 03 CH through out to increase the number of courses in the
last two years.
• The universities may feel free to offer more combined, or separate
literature and linguistics courses in the pattern given in the “Scheme of
Studies” depending on their learners’ needs, regional demands and
available expertise in their English departments. Like in the above
given “Scheme of Studies” more combined or separate courses can be
introduced in Year 03 (Semester V and VI) in the fields of literature and
language and linguistics as per the local/ regional needs and
requirements.
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 13 of 95
BA (HONS) 04-YEARS PROGRAM
COMPULSORY ENGLISH COURSES
YEAR ONE (YR: 01)
Semester I
1. Foundations of English – I:
Aim/s: To enhance language skills and develop critical thinking
Contents:
• Use of grammar in context
o Tenses: meaning & use
o Use of active and passive voice
o Use of articles and prepositions
o Different sentence patterns
o Combining sentences
• Oral Communication Skills (Listening and Speaking)
o Express ideas/opinions on topics related to students’ lives and
experiences
o Participate in classroom discussions on contemporary issues
• Reading and Writing Skills
o Skimming
o Scanning
o Identifying main idea/topic sentence
o Inference and prediction
o Recognizing and interpreting cohesive devices
o Note taking and note making
o Generating ideas using a variety of strategies e.g. brainstorming
o Developing a paragraph outline (topic sentence and supporting
details)
o Vocabulary building skills
• To develop the ability to use a dictionary
Reference Books:
• Collins COBUILD Students’ Grammar. London: Longman
• Eastwood, J. 2004. Oxford Practice Grammar. New Ed., with tests and
answers. O UP
• Fisher, A. 2001. Critical Thinking. C UP
• Goatly, A. 2000. Critical Reading and Writing: An Introductory Course.
London: Taylor & Francis
• Hacker, D. 1992. A Writer’s Reference. 2nd Ed. Boston: St. Martin’s
• Hewing, M. Advanced Grammar in Use. New Ed. C UP
• Murphy, Raymond. Grammar in Use. C UP
• Swan, M. and Walter C. How English Works. Oxford: O UP
• Thomson & Martinet. Practical English Grammar. O UP
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 14 of 95
• Wallace, M. 1992. Study Skills. C UP
• Yorky, R. Study Skills.
Semester II
1. Foundations of English – II:
Aim/s: To enhance language skills and develop critical thinking
Contents:
• Use of grammar in context
o Phrase, clause and sentence structure
o Reported speech
o Modals
• Oral Communication Skills (Listening and Speaking)
o Comprehend and use English inside and outside the classroom
for social and academic purposes
• Reading and Writing Skills
o Distinguishing between facts and opinions
o Recognizing and interpreting the tone and attitude of the author
o Recognizing and interpreting the rhetorical organization of a text
o Generating ideas using a variety of strategies e.g. mind map
o Developing an outline for an essay
o Writing different kinds of essay (descriptive and narrative)
o Vocabulary building skills
Reference Books:
• Collins COBUILD Students’ Grammar. London: Longman
• Eastwood, J. 2004. Oxford Practice Grammar. New Ed., with tests
and answers. O UP
• Goatly, A. 2000. Critical Reading and Writing: An Introductory
Course. London: Taylor & Francis
• Murphy, Raymond. Grammar in Use. C UP
• Thomson & Martinet. Practical English Grammar. O UP
• Wallace, M. 1992. Study Skills. C UP
• Yorky, R. Study Skills.
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 15 of 95
BA (HONS) 04-YEARS PROGRAM
CORE COURSES IN ENGLISH
YEAR ONE (YR: 01)
B.A. (Honors) in English is expected to be a multi-disciplinary major with the
aim of deepening theoretical as well as textual understanding of classical and
contemporary literatures. The objective is to develop intellectual capacity of
the students to think critically on social, political and cultural issues, and
acquire skills to examine subjects with an engaging objectivity.
Semester I
Introduction to Literature – I (Essays and Short Stories):
This is an introductory course for the study of literature in general and to be
more specific for the study of essays and short stories from various parts of
the world written or translated in English language. The course will begin by
raising some very basic and exciting questions: What constitutes literature?
Why should people study it? What have been and are its functions, so on
and so forth? The course is basically designed for those students who want
to learn how to decipher, comprehend, discuss, evaluate, enjoy, and above
all analyze international literary texts by examining the use of words, images,
metaphors, or symbols. Students, to be familiarized with the terminology
employed and some theories of prose and fiction writing, will be exposed to
read works of literature from a variety of time periods and geographical
areas. Although much training in literary analysis and literary criticism is not
required at this stage, the readings suggested for this course will train
learners into exploring comparative measures to assess the quality of any
acknowledged literary text.
NOTE: The suggested list of texts serves as a guideline for picking on variety
while the teachers of various colleges and universities must feel free to limit,
delete, add or change the types of readings as per academic needs and
requirements of their institutions. However, the selected primary texts offer
an interconnected versatility on our classical and contemporary interests.
Suggested Primary Reading:
Essays
• Ngugi Wa Thiongo: On Abolition of English Department
• Dale Spender: Man Made Language
• Ralph Allison: Hidden Name and Complex Fate
• Lermentov: A Hero of Our Times
• George Orwell: Why I Write
• Martin Luther King: I have a Dream
• Charles Lamb: Chimney Sweeper
• Francis Bacon: On Studies
• Montaigne: On Idleness
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 16 of 95
• Jamaica Kincaid: A Small Place
• Goodwin: What is Poetry
• Achbe: The Novelist as Teacher
Short Stories
• Oscar Wilde: Rose and the Nightingale
• O’ Henry: After Twenty Years
• James Thurber: The Secret Life of Walter Mitty
• Katherine Mansfield: Miss Brill
• Nadine Gordimer: Once Upon a Time
• Saki: The Interlopers
• Naguib Mahfouz: The Mummy Awakens
• Guy de Maupassant: The String
• D. H. Lawrence: The Fox
• Issac Asimov: True Love
• James Joyce: The Araby
• Rudyard Kipling: The Man who would be King
• Dorothy Parker: Arrangement in Black and White
• O’Conor: Everything that Rises Must Sink
• Kate Chopin: The Story of an Hour
Suggested Supplementary Reading:
• William Henry Hudson, An Introduction to the Study of Literature.
London: Morrison and Gibb, 1963.
• Robin Mayhead, Understanding Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge UP,
1979.
• Rene Wellek and Austin Warren, Theory of Literature. London:
Penguin, 1982.
• Terry Eagleton, Literary Theory: An Introduction. England: Blackwell
Publishers, 1996.
Semester I
Introduction to Linguistics – I:
Aim/s: To introduce students to the basic concepts in linguistics and
language study
Contents:
• Basic terms and concepts in Linguistics
o What is language (e.g. design features, nature and functions of
language)
o What is linguistics (e.g. diachronic/synchronic;
paradigmatic/syntagmatic relations)
• Elements of Language
o Phonology (Sounds of English)
o Morphology (Word forms & structures)
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 17 of 95
o Syntax (Sentence structures)
o Semantics (Meanings)
Reference Books:
• Aitchison, J. 2000. Linguistics (Teach Yourself Books).
• Farmer, A. K; Demers, R. A. A Linguistics Workbook
• Finch, G. How to Study Linguistics: A Guide to Understanding
Linguistics. Palgrave
• Fromkin, V. A; Rodman, R. and Hymas, M. 2002. Introduction to
Language. 6th Ed. New York: Heinley
• Todd, L. 1987. An Introduction to Linguistics. Moonbeam Publications
• Yule, G. 1996. The Study of Language. C UP.
Semester II
Introduction to Literature II (Drama and Poetry):
A complementary reading for “Introduction to Literature – I,” this is another
introductory course for the study of literature in general and to be more
specific for drama and poetry from various parts of the world written or
translated in English language. The course will begin raise the same basic
and exciting questions: What constitutes literature? Why should people study
it? What have been and are its functions, so on and so forth? It is designed
for those students who want to learn how to comprehend and analyse
international literary texts by examining the use of words, images, metaphors,
or symbols. Students will be familiarized with the terminology employed and
some theories of poetics. They will also learn about inter-cultural contacts
and other comparative measures to assess the quality of any acknowledged
literary text.
NOTE: The suggested list of texts serves as a guideline for picking on variety
while the teachers of various colleges and universities must feel free to limit,
delete, add or change the types of readings as per academic needs and
requirements of their institutions. However, the selected primary texts offer
an interconnected versatility on our classical and contemporary interests.
Suggested Primary Reading:
Drama
• Moliere: The Doctor In spite of Himself
• John Millington Synge: Riders to the Sea
• Oscar Wilde: Importance of Being Earnest
• Reginald Rose: Twelve Angry Men
Poetry
• William Shakespeare: Like as the waves make towards the pebble,
Sonnet 30
• John Keats: Ode to Nightingale
• John Donne: Death be Not Proud
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 18 of 95
• William Blake: Little Black Boy
• Maya Angelou: Women Work
• Robert Frost: The Road Not Taken
• Sameus Heaney: Digging
• Hughes: Hawk Roosting
• Langston Hughes: Theme for English Bee
• Allen Poe: Annabell Lee
• Donald Baker: Formal Application
• Marianne Moore: Poetry
• Taufeeq Rafat: The Stone Chat
• Daud Kamal: The Water Carrier
Suggested Supplementary Reading:
• William Henry Hudson, An Introduction to the Study of Literature.
London: Morrison and Gibb, 1963.
• Robin Mayhead, Understanding Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge UP,
1979.
• Rene Wellek and Austin Warren, Theory of Literature. London:
Penguin, 1982.
• Terry Eagleton, Literary Theory: An Introduction. England: Blackwell
Publishers, 1996.
Semester II
Introduction to Linguistics II:
Aim/s: To introduce the students to:
• major schools and movements in linguistics
• use of language in communication
Contents:
• Scope of linguistics: an introduction to major branches of linguistics
• Schools of linguistics (generativism, structuralism, functionalism)
• Discourse Analysis (coherence/cohesion)
Reference Books:
• Akmajian, A; Demers, R. A; Farmer, A. K. and Harnish, R. M. 2001.
Linguistics: An Introduction to Language and Communication. 4th
Ed. Massachusetts: MIT
• Coulthard, Malcolm. 1985. An Introduction to Discourse Analysis.
New Ed. London: Longman
• Gee, J. A. P. 2005. An Introduction to Discourse Analysis
• McCarthy, Michael. 1991. Discourse Analysis for Language
Teachers. Cambridge: C UP
• Todd, L. 1987. An Introduction to Linguistics. Moonbeam
Publications.
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 19 of 95
BA (HONS) 04-YEARS PROGRAM
COMPULSORY COURSES IN ENGLISH
YEAR TWO (YR: 02)
Semester III
Communication Skills:
Aim/s: To enable the students to meet their real life communication needs
Contents:
• Preparing for interviews (scholarship, job, placement for internship,
etc.)
• Writing formal letters
• Writing different kinds of applications (leave, job, complaint, etc.)
• Oral presentation skills (prepared and unprepared talks)
• Preparing a Curriculum Vitae (CV), (bio-data)
• Writing short reports
Reference Books:
• Ellen, K. 2002. Maximize Your Presentation Skills: How to Speak, Look
and Act on Your Way to the Top
• Hargie, O. (ed.) Handbbook of Communications Skills
• Mandel, S. 2000. Effective Presentation Skills: A Practical Guide Better
Speaking
• Mark, P. 1996. Presenting in English. Language Teaching Publications.
Semester IV
Academic Reading and Writing:
Aims: To enable the students to:
o read the lines (literal understanding of text)
o read between the lines (to interpret text)
o read beyond the lines (to assimilate, integrate knowledge etc.)
o write examination answers
o write well organized academic text with topic/thesis
statement/supporting details
o write narrative, descriptive, argumentative essays and reports
(assignments)
Contents:
1. Critical Reading
Advanced reading skills and strategies building on Foundations of
English I & II courses in semesters I and II.
HEC – NCRC – English (2005-06): BA (Hons) & MA (Hons), Page 20 of 95
o expository (description, argumentation, comparison and
contrast
2. Academic Writing
Advanced writing skills and strategies building on Foundations of
English I & II in semesters I and II:
o report writing
o assignments/term-papers
o examination answers
Reference Books:
• Aaron, J. 2003. The Compact Reader. New York: Bedford
• Axelrod, R. B and Cooper, C.R. 2002. Reading Critical Writing Well: A
Reader and Guide
• Barnet, S. and Bedau, H. 2004. Critical Thinking, Reading and Writing:
A Brief Guide to Writing. 6th Ed.
• Gardner, P. S. 2005. New Directions: Reading, Writing and Critical
Thinking
• George, D. and Trimbur, J. 2006. Reading Culture: Context for Critical
Reading and Writing. 6th Ed.
• Goatly, A. 2000. Critical Reading and Writing: An Introductory Course.
London: Taylor & Francis
• Grellet, F. Writing for Advanced Learners of English. C UP
• Jordan, K. M. and Plakans, L. 2003. Reading and Writing for Academic
Success
• Jordon, R. R. 1999. Academic Writing Course. C UP.
• Smith, L. C. 2003. Issues for Today: An Effective Reading Skills Text
• Withrow, J. Effective Writing. C UP
Semester IV
Citizenship Education (Human Rights [HR] Component):
This particular course deals with good citi


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