• QUANTITY SURVEYING


  •   
  • FileName: 23rd March 2011 IDoW DRAFT (QS) .pdf [read-online]
    • Abstract: professional Quantity Surveying (QS) services. In essence, this document defines the work ... indirectly affected by any quantity surveying activity, or by an outcome or influence of ...

Download the ebook

QUANTITY SURVEYING
DRAFT
IDENTIFICATION OF WORK TO BE PERFORMED BY PERSONS REGISTERED IN
TERMS OF THE QUANTITY SURVEYING PROFESSION ACT 2000
(ACT NO. 49 OF 2000)
23rd March 2011: DRAFT - approval by the SACQSP pending Page 1 of 23
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE
1 INTRODUCTION 3
2 DEFINITIONS 3
3 GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 5
4 GENERAL INFORMATION: WORK TO BE PERFORMED BY PERSONS 5
REGISTERED IN TERMS OF ACT 49/2000
4.1 Description of the Quantity Surveying Profession 5
4.2 Nature and Type of Projects 5
4.3 Application of the Provision of this Document 5
4.4 Project Work Stages 5
4.5 General Notes 6
5 QUANTITY SURVEYING WORK 7
6 PROVISIONS OF THE QUANTITY SURVEYING PROFESSION ACT 9
6.1 Compliance with the Quantity Surveying Profession Act, 2000
6.2 Improper Conduct 9
7 OVERLAPS: WORK WHICH PERSONS REGISTERED IN TERMS OF OTHER 10
LEGISLATION WISH TO PERFORM IN CONTRAVENTION OF THAT WORK
BEING RESERVED FOR PERFORMANCE BY PERSONS REGISTERED IN
TERMS OF THE QUANTITY SURVEYING PROFESSION ACT 2000 (ACT NO 49
OF 2000)
ANNEXURES
ANNEXURE A SACQSP GUIDELINES : ASSESSMENT OF PROFESSIONAL 12
COMPETENCE
ANNEXURE B SCOPE OF SERVICES TO BE INCLUDED IN A CLIENT/ 18
QUANTITY SURVEYOR AGREEMENT
ANNEXURE C SACQSP REGISTRATION ROUTES FOR CANDITATE QUANTITY 22
SURVEYORS
23rd March 2011: DRAFT - approval by the SACQSP pending Page 2 of 23
1.0 INTRODUCTION
The following are detailed descriptions of standard activities and functions inherent in delivering
professional Quantity Surveying (QS) services. In essence, this document defines the work set
aside for persons registered as Quantity Surveyors in the specified categories of registration
The contents of this document describe standard services which are generic to most Built
Environment projects.
There is often a lack of comprehension of the work performed by Quantity Surveyors. This is to the
general detriment of the construction industry macro economy and the micro-economy of the
individual projects in terms of profitability / feasibility, cost management and value for money derived
by clients of the industry.
Reservation of work for persons registered in terms of Section 18 of Act 49/2000
- optimises the application of scarce, highly-skilled human resources,
- minimises a client’s financial risk,
- promotes best value for money spent,
- protects the Public
Section 26 of the Act requires SACQSP to make recommendations to the Council for the Built
Environment (CBE), regarding the work identified in terms of subsection (2) and prohibits a person
not registered in terms of this Act to perform any kind of work identified for any category of
professional registered in terms of this Act.
2.0 DEFINITIONS
“Built Environment” refers to the functional field in which registered persons practice. The Built
Environment includes all structures that are planned and/or erected above or underground, as well
as the land utilised for the defined purposes and the provision of supporting infrastructure.
“Quantity surveying” is the provision of expert, professional advice on construction costs. Quantity
surveyors are trained, experienced specialists who have acquired comprehensive knowledge of
construction economics. They collaborate / co-operate with members of other Built Environment
Professions. To protect their clients’ interests, Quantity surveyors
 act as principal agents
 advise on cost planning, cost analysis and cost control of projects by preparing cost estimates,
budgets and other cost advice information which may be required at sketch plan (draft design)
stage - such as elemental or other standard forms of cost plans linked to design development -
and also advise on budget-allocation to various construction components or project phases
 undertake financial feasibility ( viability / profitability) studies to predict possible rates of return on
commercial investment projects
 prepare bills of quantities / provisional bills of quantities / schedules of rates and other tender
documents such as the main contract, sub-contracts and those related to other aspects of work
to be done, for example interior design and art, and also negotiate rates and prices with contractors
 evaluate tenders and, after checking and confirming prices in bills of quantities. prepare reports and
(if necessary) adjust unit rates in bills of quantities
 prepare valuations for monthly payment certificates
 manage all the financial aspects of construction projects to ensure that they are erected within
approved budgets
“Project” means the full scope of a development envisaged by a client, including the provision of
professional services.
“Works” means all work executed or intended to be executed in accordance with a construction
contract.
“Principal Agent” means a person or entity appointed by a client, and who has full authority and
obligation to act on behalf of that client in terms of a construction contract.
23rd March 2011: DRAFT - approval by the SACQSP pending Page 3 of 23
“Principal Consultant” means a person or entity appointed by a client to manage and administer
the services of all other consultants appointed to provide professional services on a specific project.
“Contractor” means any person or legal entity entering into a contract with a client for the execution
of the works or part thereof of a specific project.
“Nominated Sub-contractors” are specialist- and other sub-contractors who are nominated by a
Principal Consultant to execute work or supply and fix any goods in terms of a specific contract.
“Selected Sub-contractors” are specialists and other sub-contractors who are selected by a
contractor in consultation with a Principal Consultant to execute work or supply and fix any goods in
terms of a specific contract.
“Domestic Sub-contractors” are specialists and other sub-contractors who are selected and
appointed by a contractor to execute work or supply and fix any goods in terms of a specific contract.
“Direct Contractors” are contractors appointed by a client to execute work other than the works
related to a specific contract.
“Suppliers” are persons or entities appointed by a client to supply goods and products for
incorporation into the works related to a specific contract.
“Construction Programme” is an appropriately detailed programme for the works related to a
specific contract, which
 is used for monitoring the progress of those works and
 indicates the logical sequence and duration of all activities to be completed by the contractors,
sub-contractors and suppliers.
“Contract programme” is a construction programme for the works related to a specific contract,
agreed between the contractor and the Principal Agent.
“Procurement Programme” is a programme indicating the timeous acquisition of resources for a
specific project, including, but not limited to, appointment of consultants, contractors, sub-contractors
and suppliers required for the execution of the project programme.
“Project Initiation Programme” is a delivery schedule structured by a Principal Consultant in
consultation with the client and other consultants, indicating all the necessary work to be completed
prior to commencement by contractors of the works related to a specific contract.
“Documentation Programme” is a schedule prepared by a Principal Consultant in collaboration
with other consultants appointed by the client, indicating the timeous provision of all necessary
design documentation required by the contractors and subcontractors for the construction of the
works related to a specific contract.
“The South African Council for the Quantity Surveying Profession” means the South African
Council for the Quantity Surveying Profession established as a juristic person by section 2 of the
Quantity Surveying Profession Act, 2000 (Act No. 49 of 2000, as amended), and “SACQSP” has the
same meaning.
“Quantity Surveying Profession Act” means the Quantity Surveying Profession Act, 2000 (Act No.
49 of 2000, as amended).
“Quantity Surveying Work” means the work identified under section 4 of this Identification of Work
for Quantity Surveyors document.
“Improper Conduct” contemplated in section 27(3) of the Quantity Surveying Profession Act, 2000,
as amended), means failure to comply with the code of conduct for registered persons.
“Public” means any person or group of persons who is, or whose environment is either directly or
indirectly affected by any quantity surveying activity, or by an outcome or influence of a quantity
surveying activity, or by a service provided in terms of quantity surveying activity, which may impact
on the health, safety and interest of such person or group of persons.
23rd March 2011: DRAFT - approval by the SACQSP pending Page 4 of 23
“Substantially Practise” means
 regularly and consistently executing or performing quantity surveying work identified in section
4 of this Identification of Work for Quantity Surveyors document,
 charging professional fees for such work and
 accruing professional responsibility to a client or an employer for the performance of such work
and related functions.
“The Council for the Built Environment” means the juristic person established by section 2 of
the Council for the Built Environment Act, 2000 (Act No 43 of 2000)
------------------------------------------------
Section 26 of the Act requires SACQSP to make recommendations to the Council for the Built
Environment (CBE), regarding the work identified in terms of subsection (2) and prohibits a person
not registered in terms of this Act to perform any kind of work identified for any category of
professional registered in terms of this Act.
23rd March 2011: DRAFT - approval by the SACQSP pending Page 5 of 23
3.0 GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
The goal of this document is to make recommendations to the CBE regarding the work that is to be
Identified for the quantity surveying profession.
The objectives of this document are to:
 comply with legislative requirements,
 protect the public by defining the work that each registration category of the quantity
surveying professionals can undertake,
 protect the environment and promote effective environmental management,
 promote the sustainability of the developments,
 provide a framework for the identification of work and the demarcation of identified work
between professionals,
 provide an effective and efficient mechanism for addressing and recognising overlaps and
duplication between work identified by different professions,
 ensure that where work is to be carried out by different categories of professionals, there are
clear and transparent ways of determining the category of profession to carry out the work,
 promote the transparency and accountability of the identification of work process, and
4.0 GENERAL INFORMATION: WORK TO BE PERFORMED BY PERSONS
REGISTERED IN TERMS OF ACT 49/2000
4.1 Description of the Quantity Surveying Profession
Quantity Surveying is work performed by professional consultants appointed by clients who
wish to invest in property developments. Quantity surveyors advise their clients, architects,
engineers and other service providers on all financial and contractual matters arising from
the earliest commencement of construction projects right through to completion of finished
structures and must develop a full understanding of various systems of building construction,
specialised services and installations, materials and plant (machinery) together with the
many forms of contract and sub-contract agreements available for use in the construction
industry. Quantity surveyors are also competent to advise their clients and other consultants
regarding alternative methods of construction as well as the prices of different materials
.
Professional quantity surveying work is based on a qualification through formal education,
specific training and experience that provides a special range of skills that are applied to a
wide range of problem-solving situations, predominantly related to project costs and
construction contracts
4.2 Nature and Types of Projects
The nature and types of projects to be implemented in terms of the Identification of Work for
Quantity Surveyors registered in terms of the Quantity Surveying Profession Act 2000 (Act
No 49 of 2000) shall be all construction work within the Built Environment.
4.3 Application of the Provisions of this Document
The provisions of this document shall be applicable in respect of :-
1. Any project and construction management work performed within the borders of the
Republic of South Africa (RSA), whether or not the intended outcome of such work is to
be executed outside the RSA.
2. Any person who is not ordinarily resident in the Republic of South Africa, but who
performs quantity surveying work within the RSA.
4.4 Project Work Stages
Typical construction projects comprise the following Project Work stages:
23rd March 2011: DRAFT -
4.4.1. Inception: approval by the SACQSP pending Page 6 of 23
Project initiation and briefing: establishing the client’s requirements and preferences,
assessing user needs and options, appointments of consultants, establishing the project brief
4.4.2. Concept and Feasibility:
Preparing and finalising the project concept in accordance with the brief including the scope,
scale, character, form, function and preliminary programme and viability of the project
4.4.3. Design Development:
Developing the approved concept to finalise the design, outline specifications, cost plan,
financial viability and programme for the project
4.4.4. Tender Documentation and Procurement
Preparing the construction and procurement documentation, confirm and implement the
procurement strategies and procedures for effective and timeous procurement of necessary
resources for the execution of the project
4.4.5. Construction
Preparation and co-ordination of the procedures and documentation to facilitate practical
completion of the works; managing, administering and monitoring the contracts and
processes, including the preparation and co-ordination of the procedures and documentation
to facilitate practical completion of the works
4.4.6. Project Close Out
Fulfilling and completing the project close-out including the preparation of the necessary
documentation to facilitate effective completion, handover and operation of the project
4.5 General Notes
4.5.1. As these stages might overlap, the Standard Services stated in section 4 of this Identification
Of Work for Quantity Surveyors document, may be required to be undertaken during any one
Of the Project Work Stages.
4.5.2 The order of the Standard Services does not necessarily reflect the actual sequence of
implementation.
4.5.3 Notwithstanding the Project Work Stage definitions, the timing of a Quantity Surveyor’s
involvement will depend on a client’s specific Procurement Strategy
23rd March 2011: DRAFT - approval by the SACQSP pending Page 7 of 23
5 QUANTITY SURVEYING WORK
IDENTIFICATION OF WORK TO BE PERFORMED BY QUANTITY SURVEYORS
I.E.
PERSONS REGISTERED IN TERMS OF
THE QUANTITY SURVEYING PROFESSION ACT, 2000 (ACT NO 49 OF 2000)
Honours Degree Professional Provision of advanced quantity surveying expertise Associated Competencies (Unit
in Quantity Quantity within the following core activities and delivery of Standard Numbers)
Surveying Surveyor the full scope of professional services
(minimum 360 Note: Persons registered as Professional Quantity
credits plus Surveyors are permitted to open their own firms
minimum: 120 and practice for their own accounts
credits)
Interacting with relevant stakeholders in the construction industry, eg working with
plumbers for the on-site re-measurement of plumbing 14415
Interpreting construction drawings and specifications 14426
Basic setting-out of construction works, using appropriate survey equipment
14428
Compilation of price determination documents and utilising the information in project Undertake elementary descriptive
administration applications quantification
Taking off quantities and preparing price determination documents for small / simple load Undertake basic descriptive
bearing structures quantification
Taking off quantities, preparing and pricing price determination documents for both load Undertake intermediate descriptive
bearing and framed structures quantification
Implementing appropriate budgetary processes related to Built Environment projects, Undertake budgetary reporting
cash flow forecasting and management, and preparing financial reports
Preparing cost estimates for Built Environment projects, including advising on design- Prepare cost estimates for Built
cost alternatives, undertaking project cost norm analyses, and preparing replacement Environment projects
cost valuations
Undertaking the cost planning and cost control of Built Environment projects Prepare for and implement cost
planning processes related to Built
Environment projects
Providing procurement advice for Built Environment projects, including matching clients’ Provide procurement advice for Built
strategic objectives with procurement system characteristics Environment projects
Managing payment processes during Built Environment project construction Managing payment processes during
Built Environment project construction
Identifying and managing the effects of scope-change on Built Environment projects Manage the effect of change in the
nature and scope of Built Environment
projects
Determining the resources required by Built Environment project production processes Determine resource requirements for
Built Environment projects
Undertaking the contractual management of Built Environment projects Apply legal principles to the
contractual management of Built
Environment projects
Undertaking the strategic planning of Built Environment projects, including contributing Strategic planning of Built
to brief development, cost / benefit analyses and economic and financial analyses Environment projects
Providing advice on appropriate types of contract documents and price determination Providing advice on contract
methods documents and price determination
methods for Built Environment
projects
Managing the production / preparation of price determination and cost management Manage production processes of price
documents for Built Environment projects determination documents for Built
Environment projects
Resolving claims, preparing the final account and applying close-out procedures Resolve claims, settle disputes and
apply close-out procedures on Built
Environment projects
23rd March 2011: DRAFT - approval by the SACQSP pending Page 8 of 23
Developing and implementing project service quality assurance procedures Implement project service quality
assurance on Built Environment
projects
Undertaking financial feasibility studies for Built Environment projects, including market Undertake financial feasibility studies
need, risk and return analyses for Built Environment projects
Planning and managing environmental initiatives for construction projects 114656
Managing and administering construction projects on site 115119 and
115449
Managing construction organisational assets 115444
Designing, compiling and utilising project cost information databases for the financial Compile a project cost information
management of Built Environment projects eg elemental cost analyses database for Built Environment
projects
Managing the price determination, awarding and evaluation processes associated with Manage price determination processes
Built Environment projects eg tender process management for Built Environment projects
Managing risk on Built Environment projects by identifying, analysing and responding to Manage risk on Built Environment
risk events projects
Undertaking whole life appraisal of Built Environment projects Undertake whole life appraisal of Built
Environment projects
Contributing to the sustainability assessment of Built Environment projects Understand the principles of
sustainability assessment for Built
Environment projects
Undertaking value management exercises for Built Environment projects Understand value management
processes on Built Environment
projects
Designing and implementing specialised service quality assurance procedures Design and implement specialised
quality assurance procedures
Conducting tax assessments on Built Environment projects, including tax depreciation, Conduct tax assessments on Built
and Value Added Tax (VAT) and Capital Gains Tax (CGT) assessments Environment projects
Conducting land and related tax assessments of Built Environment projects Conduct land and related tax
assessments of Built Environment
projects
Conducting premises-, energy-, maintenance- and asset register audits Conduct specialised audits of Built
Environment projects
Taking off quantities, preparing and pricing price determination documents for Undertake advanced descriptive
specialised elements of complex buildings quantification
Undertaking professional practice management in a quantity surveying enterprise, Understand professional practice
including structuring the enterprise, negotiating quantity surveyor-client agreements, and management procedures in a quantity
applying relevant fee scales surveying enterprise
6 PROVISIONS OF THE QUANTITY SURVEYING PROFESSION ACT NO 49 OF 2000
6.5 Compliance with the Quantity Surveying Profession Act, 2000
6.1.1. Section 18(2) states that a person may not practise in any of the registration categories
unless he or she is registered in that category.
6.1.2. Section 18(3) states that a person who is registered in the category of candidate must
perform work in the quantity surveying profession only under the supervision and control of a
professional of a category as prescribed.
23rd March 2011: DRAFT - approval by the SACQSP pending Page 9 of 23
6.1.3. Section 26(3)(a) states that a person who is not registered in terms of this Act, may not
perform any kind of work identified for any category of registered persons. However section
26(4) states clearly that this may not be construed as prohibiting any person form performing
work identified in terms of section 26, if such work is performed in the service of or by order
of and under the direction, control, supervision of or in association with a registered person
entitled to perform the work identified and who must assume responsibility for any work so
performed.
6.6 Improper Conduct
Section 27(3) states that all registered persons must comply with the code of conduct and
failure to do so constitutes improper conduct.
7 OVERLAPS: WORK WHICH PERSONS REGISTERED IN TERMS OF OTHER
LEGISLATION WISH TO PERFORM IN CONTRAVENTION OF THAT WORK BEING
RESERVED FOR PERFORMANCE BY PERSONS REGISTERED IN TERMS OF THE
QUANTITY SURVEYING PROFESSION ACT 2000 (ACT NO 49 OF 2000)
Section 26(1) of the Quantity Surveying Profession Act states that the identification of the type of
quantity surveying work which may be performed by persons registered in any of the categories
referred to in section 18, should include work which may fall within the scope of any other profession
regulated by the professions’ Act referred to in the Council for the Built Environment Act, 2000. It
therefore pre-supposes that there may be overlaps amongst the professions registered under the
various Built Environment Councils.
The CBE Policy Framework on Identification of Work recognises these potential overlaps and
suggests that the issue of overlaps be resolved by the professions
(17th March 2011: SACAP/SACQSP discussions about “overlaps”, attended by 4 SACQSP
representatives: Ms Nina van Jaarsveld; Messrs Leon Cronje, Lindile Mteza and Jones Naidoo)
23rd March 2011: DRAFT - approval by the SACQSP pending Page 10 of 23
ANNEXURE A
SACQSP GUIDELINES: ASSESSMENT OF PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE
1. SUPERVISED / DIARISED / RECORDED / LOGGED / CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE TO
BE GAINED BY CANDIDATE QUANTITY SURVEYORS
Candidates must demonstrate that they have gained appropriate, supervised, mentored professional
experience in either the building or the engineering construction industry
Experience in the building industry includes building-related engineering services
For the purpose of an Assessment of Professional Competence (APC), engineering construction
incorporates both civil engineering and mechanical/electrical engineering associated with engineering
construction
Broad definitions of different engineering disciplines are the following:
(i) Civil engineering
o Major earthworks
o Roads and bridges
o Railways
o Tunnelling, shaft-sinking and underground development
o Major sewerage and water treatment facilities
o Dams
o Harbours
o Treatment of industrial effluent
o Major civil construction works associated with power generation, other processing plants and similar
works
o Surface works – offices, changehouses and substations
o Surface works – civil/structural/piping/mechanical/E&I installations for capital and maintenance work
(concentrator plants, furnaces, converters, acid plants, etc.
o Secondary / ancillary enterprises which support the engineering industry, for example chemical
processing plants eg. Sasol
(ii) Mechanical engineering
o Process and manufacturing plants including but not limited to pipework, ductwork, insulation, heavy
lifting gear and fire protection systems
o Production platforms and the like for the oil and gas industry
o Pipelines for fluid and gas transmission
o Material-handling installations
o Ductwork, plate work and associated plant for use in the chemical and mining industries
o Large scale heating, ventilation and air-conditioning installations
o Structural steelwork
o Building and civil engineering work in connection with the foregoing
(iii) Electrical engineering
o Transmission cabling and supports
o Installations in connection with engineering construction
o Switchgear and transformers
o High-voltage power transmission
o Medium and low-voltage power transmission
o Lighting and power installations
o Instrumentation
o Space heating
o Fire detection
o Communication installations within building and civil engineering work in connection with the foregoing
Section 4 presents skills competencies which are fundamental to quantity surveying, in which Candidates
are required to demonstrate their competence
Section 4 (v) covers specialised activities, some of which may not be undertaken by all firms or Employer
organisations, and while Candidates may be exposed to certain aspects of specialised services, they will
23rd March 2011: DRAFT - approval by the SACQSP pending Page 11 of 23
not be expected to have achieved competence in all the listed activities
Experience recorded in a Candidate’s diaries should be referenced in terms of the SACQSP Logbook
skills categories. Some activities may be recorded under more than one heading and should reflect a
balanced distribution of practical experience
If Candidates are unable to obtain sufficient experience in a particular skills category, simulation offers an
acceptable alternative. They should undertake assignments based on previously-completed tasks
performed within their offices and submit their completed assignments for evaluation by their supervisors /
mentors. Alternatively, they should be permitted to observe / assist their supervisors / mentors in the
latter’s’ performance of such tasks
Candidates must obtain the Council’s approval of any quantity surveying experience which does not fall
within the areas specified in section 4
Candidates who change their
 place of employment or the type of industry in which they are employed (building to engineering or vice
versa)
 supervisor / mentor
must submit full details of such changes to the Council for approval
2. SUPERVISED / MENTORED PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE TO BE GAINED
BY A CANDIDATE UNDER THE GUIDANCE OF A REGISTERED MENTOR, APPOINTED IN
TERMS OF THE DECLARATION OF THE CANDIDATE’S EMPLOYER
(i)
Cost advice and cost planning
o Preparing and using cost data
o Preparing estimates
o Undertaking financial feasibility and comparative studies
o Preparing and using detailed budgets and cost plans, cost checking during design development;
compiling and using cost limits
o Preparing and applying cost-in-use studies; life cycle costing
o Preparing and interpreting turnover/cash flow projections and profit/loss forecasts
o Cost control and reporting during pre-contract period
(ii) Contract documentation
o Preparing bills of quantities for principal or sub-contracts of supply including the measurement and
description of work, drafting of preliminaries, preambles and contract conditions
o Preparing bills of measurement for final accounts if measured from drawings
o Preparing specifications and/or schedules of rates
o Contractual correspondence
(iii) Tendering and contractual arrangements
o Formulating or implementing procedures on tendering and contractual arrangements for principal or sub-
contracts or contracts of supply
o Advising on selection of tenders; evaluation of and reporting on tenders
o Preparing tenders including compilation of rates for work and preliminaries
(iv) Contract services
The following are applicable to principal contracts or sub-contracts:
o Advising on cost during progress of the works, estimating final costs and reporting on the financial
aspects
o Monitoring of proposed construction methods or sequences and reporting on actual requirements;
preparing cost benefit reports on alternative construction methods
o Cost control during progress of the works
o Preparing valuations for interim certificates
o Analysing contract price relative to cost recording methods
o Preparing and agreeing final accounts and contra charges
o Reporting on, evaluating and negotiating contractual and extra-contractual issues; contract
correspondence; attending site meetings
o Preparing or interpreting cost/value and other reconciliation statements for management purposes
o Surveying, measuring and recording site information
23rd March 2011: DRAFT - approval by the SACQSP pending Page 12 of 23
(v) Specialisations
o Taxation allowances and grants
o Planning or programming of contract works
o Resource determination, scheduling and purchasing
o Procurement of plant and materials
o Production cost/quality control, time standards and operational methods
o Productivity methods and evaluation
o Project planning and project management
o Insurance
o Litigation and arbitration
o Insolvency and liquidation
o Planned preventative maintenance
o Schedules of dilapidation
o Technical audits
o Office management including resource allocation, fees and budgets
o Maintenance of buildings
o Research and development
Details of any other specialisations that Candidates may wish to include must be submitted to the Council for
prior approval
3. SUBMISSION OF INTERIM OR FINAL REPORTS: THE DATES STATED IN THE LETTER TO
A CANDIDATE, WILL CORRESPOND WITH CLOSING DATES FOR RECEIPT OF
SUBMISSIONS INDICATED IN THE CURRENT SACQSP YEAR PLANNER
Candidates and their Employers / Supervisors must complete the application form for Inspection of Reports
(Interim / Final), and enclose the following documents for delivery to the Registrar’s office
(a) certified General Report
(b) certified Project Report
(c) certified Diary Sheets
(d) certified Logbook
(i) Faxed or e-mailed submissions will not be accepted
(ii) The Registrar’s office provides written acknowledgement of receipt of all submissions
(iii) Submissions are delivered to Assessors appointed by the Council, who evaluate the content, scope and
quality of the supervised / mentored technical or professional experience gained by a Candidate, and the
standard of presentation of the certified documents
(iv) Assessors are required by the Council to provide written reports arising from their evaluation of
Candidates’ submissions. These reports are considered by the Registration Committee prior to
transmission to Candidates and their Employers
(v) Assessors’


Use: 0.019