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    • Abstract: 2008-2009 Program CatalogrCenteCareerArealCapita Table of ContentsThe Capital Area Career Center plans to offer the programs listed below during the 2009-2010 school year. The Center

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2008-
2009 P
rogra
m Cat
alog
r
Cente
Career
Area
l
Capita
Table of Contents
The Capital Area Career Center plans to offer the programs listed below during the 2009-2010 school year. The Center
reserves the right to cancel a particular program if there is insufficient enrollment.
Mission Statement ............................................................................................................................................................. 2
Overview ............................................................................................................................................................................ 2
What is Capital Area Career Center? ....................................................................................................................... 2
What is unique abut CACC? ................................................................................................................................... 2
How do you apply to CACC? ................................................................................................................................. 2
Student Activities ............................................................................................................................................................... 3
FFA ......................................................................................................................................................................... 3
FCCLA ................................................................................................................................................................... 3
Skills USA ............................................................................................................................................................... 3
Student Advisory Committee .................................................................................................................................. 3
Student Awards ....................................................................................................................................................... 3
Learning Resource Center ................................................................................................................................................. 4
Cooperative Career Education (Work Co-op) .................................................................................................................. 5
Automotive and Industrial Technology............................................................................................................................. 7
Agricultural and Industrial Mechanics ..................................................................................................................... 8
Automotive Technology/Servicing ........................................................................................................................... 9
Collision Repair Technology.................................................................................................................................. 10
Power Equipment Technology ............................................................................................................................... 11
Aviation Technology .............................................................................................................................................. 12
Information Technology and Communications ............................................................................................................. 13
Communications and Media: Graphic Arts ........................................................................................................... 14
Communications and Media: Radio-TV ............................................................................................................... 16
Communications and Media: Photography ........................................................................................................... 18
Communications and Media: Interactive Digital Media ........................................................................................ 20
Cisco Computer Networking Academy ................................................................................................................. 21
Microsoft Office Academy ..................................................................................................................................... 22
Construction and Design Technologies .......................................................................................................................... 23
Building Trades ..................................................................................................................................................... 24
Electrical/Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning .............................................................................................. 25
Welding ................................................................................................................................................................ 26
Landscape Design & Turf Management ................................................................................................................ 27
Health and Human Service Occupations........................................................................................................................ 29
Cosmetology ......................................................................................................................................................... 30
Culinary Arts......................................................................................................................................................... 31
Early Childhood Care and Education .................................................................................................................... 32
Fire Science/Emergency Services............................................................................................................................ 33
Health Occupations .............................................................................................................................................. 34
Law Enforcement .................................................................................................................................................. 35
1
Mission Statement
Capital Area Career Center
• Where our mission is to provide students the opportunity to:
• Pursue career options
• Enhance employability through technical and workplace skill development
• Transition into employment or post-secondary education
• Prepare for life-long learning

Overview
What is Capital Area Career Center?
• Career and Technical programs for juniors and seniors, one or two years in length.
• Programs are electives which apply towards high school graduation.
• College credit may be obtained by completing some of our programs (see page 6).
• Programs are two hours and twenty minutes, five days a week (except cosmetology where students can go on Saturdays, summer and
holidays if they choose).
• Tuition is paid for by the home school. There is a registration fee. Special dress and equipment are required for some programs.
• Transportation is provided by the home school.
What is unique abut CACC?
• Training at the Center is “hands on”. You gain skills by doing the work.
• Competency –based instructions allows students to work and advance at their own pace and acquire skills for employment, advanced
training, continuing education.
• Advisory committees ensure that programs reflect the technology and skills found in today’s workplace.
• Opportunities to participate in job shadowing, internships, and early experiences are encouraged and available.
How do you apply to CACC?
• Contact you high school counselor/dean- Deadlines for turning in applications vary from school to school, so check with your guid-
ance counselor/dean. Better early than late! CACC makes its initial program assignments in late February.
• Complete the CACC application form.
• Counselor/dean will send applications to CACC Student Services.
• Check with counselor/dean for conformation of enrollment.
2
Student Activities
FFA
• Integral part of the Agriculture and Industrial Mechanics and Power Equipment Technology programs
• Opportunity for students to apply their skills through hands-on experiences, take learning to the “doing” stage
• Sharpens leadership skills
• Provides network of competition and recognition
• Helps students become productive members of society
FCCLA
• Integral part of the Early Childhood Care and Education program
• Supports leadership activities in and out of the classroom
• Builds confidence by participating in special meetings, peer education training, community work and various projects
SkillsUSA
• Membership is open to all CACC students
• Designed to promote individual abilities and interests through club activities
• Annual skills competitions at local, state, national, and international levels
• Has record of producing award winners at all levels of skills competitions
• International student organization covers every area of technical education
• Students may receive scholarships to major colleges and technical schools
Student Advisory Committee
• Each program elects a representative
• Meets quarterly during class time
• Provides input and recommendations
• Participates in various beneficial CACC activities
Student Awards
• Student of the Month • National Vocational-Technical Honor Society
• Positive Student Recognition • Scholarship opportunities available through various instructions
• Student of the Year • Scholarship opportunities sponsored by Student Organizations
• Perfect Attendance Awards • Competitions at regional, state, and national
• Distinguished Honors
3
Learning Resource Center
• Located on the upper level of CACC
• Offers a variety of support services to all learners
• LRC Assistants and a Student Support Specialist are on staff to assist students and coordinate services
• Students having special needs may be provided support and services to enable them to be successful in their
career programs
Assists with:
• Making Career Decisions
• Preparing a Resume
• Career Portfolio Development
• Interviewing Skills
• Career Interest Inventories
• Job Search Techniques
• Study Skills Techniques
• Employability Skills
• Tutoring
• Note taking
• Test-taking
• Program Area Material
Provides:
• Computer Lab with Internet access
• Computerized programs for accelerated skill development in keyboarding, math, grammar, spelling and reading
• Enrichment opportunities for skill development
• Individual instructional materials
• Assessment in math and reading skills, using Standardized Achievement Tests
• Technical math, English, and reading support
• Library of Resources and References
4
Cooperative Career Education (Co-op)
What you will be able to do:
Cooperative Career Education (CCE) is a class that students will learn on-the-job skills at a training site and make money. CCE is a
method of instruction which allows students to more easily transition from school-to-career by giving students valuable training on the
job relating to their career choice. Classroom instruction and on the job training coincide with each other and provide the students with a
more meaningful educational experience.
Students will meet for 40 minutes a day for class related instruction and a total of 15 on-the-job hours each week.
Prerequisites and helpful high school courses:
There are no prerequisites. Helpful high school courses include basic math, computer keyboard.
Academic Connection:
Students who sign up and may receive 2 Dual Credits at Lincoln Land in Employability Skills. Co-op students also can continue further
training in their career interest area at Lincoln Land or a many Technical schools or Colleges.
Special Dress/Equipment
Students will be required to wear the attire of the employment area.
Career Opportunities
Capital Area Career Center Business Partners are constantly looking to update their employees to meet their business demand. Employ-
ment wages vary by skill level but must be at least minimum wage of $7.50 per hour.
Possible Employment Opportunities:
• Hospitals
• Car Dealerships
• Equipment Dealers
• Hotels
• Mechanics
• Motorcycle Shops
• Restaurants and Fast Food
• Maintenance
• Department Stores
• Menards
• Lowes
• Big R
• Wal-Mart
• Construction
• Business Offices
5
6
Aut omot ive &
echno logy
In dust rial T
Agricultural & Industrial Mechanics • Automovtive Technology/Servicing •
Collision Repair Technology • Power Equipment Technology • Aviation Technology
7
Agricultural and Industrial Mechanics
Program Length: Two Years
What You’ll Be Able To Do:
• Perform basic repairs and service on large and small gas, diesel, and LP
engine systems
• Understand the basics of power trains, electrical and hydraulics systems
• Set up new farm and construction equipment
• Make structural repairs using welding techniques
• Use parts and service manuals effectively
• Operate small hand tools, power tools, and measuring tools
• Spray paint
• Repair manual and power transmissions and brake systems
• Understand air conditioning principles
• Understand hydraulics and complete repairing
• Understand various equipment used in this area including heavy truck,
agriculture, ATV, and industrial applications
• Participate in the FFA program which offers a variety of opportunities
including contests, agricultural related activities, and group outings
• Participate in Skills USA Organization
• Windows 98-2000 internet and research documents
Academic Connection:
Agricultural and Industrial Mechanics students must understand and be able to use math and science to repair engines and diagnose me-
chanical failure. They must possess communication skills to read manuals, follow instructions, and talk to customers.
Typical Jobs to Start Your Career:
• Agricultural equipment technician or operator • Equipment parts sales
• Lawn and garden equipment technician • Spray painter semi tractor
• Industrial equipment technician or operator • Welder
• Motorcycle technician • Construction equipment operator/repairman
• Agricultural or industrial equipment sales and field service • Fabrication shop
technician
Employers of CACC Students from This Program:
• Altorfer Caterpillar Machinery • Carver’s Westside Power Equipment
• Crossroads Ford • Central Illinois Trucking
• Beatty Implement • Bobcat of Springfield
• Dept. of Transportation • Area Farmers
• Prairie International Truck Centers • IDOT
• Roland Machinery
College and Additional Training:
• One-year advanced diesel technology program
• Two-year technical degree in agricultural/construction equipment technology
• Four-year professional degree in an agricultural/industrial field
• Two-year Degree in Agricultural Business Management – LLCC
• Fertilization Occupations – LLCC
Comments:
Central Illinois abounds in opportunity for Agricultural and Industrial Mechanics students. The program provides a
head start to those interested in joining the Armed Forces in specialized areas related to this field. You can learn the
skills needed you can enter the labor force a step ahead by having college credit, and various certifications.
8 ASE and NCCER Certification Available • Dual College Credit from LLCC available
See CACC Instructor or Principal for further information
Automotive Technology/Servicing
Program Length: Two Years
What You’ll Be Able To Do:
• Go on to college if you so desire!
• Understand the practical workings and theory of the modern auto-
mobile
• Learn about different types of engines, fuel systems and power
trains
• Perform basic testing and repair of auto systems such as computer
controls, exhaust, cooling, brake, fuel, electrical, emissions, steering,
and suspension
• Understand and practice electronic engine diagnosis and computer-
ized wheel alignment
• Continue your education in the automotive technology field (bach-
elor’s degree or technical diploma)
Academic Connection:
Automotive Technology/Servicing students must have good math,
chemistry and physical science skills to learn the operation and pro-
cedures of modern automobiles. They must be able to use computers,
read manuals, follow instructions, do deductive reasoning, and talk to
customers.
Employers of CACC Students from This Program:
• Friendly Chevrolet
• Landmark Auto Group
• Chrysler Corporation
• Auto Zone
• Ford
• Wilkerson’s Shell
• General Motors
• General Aviation
• Springfield Welding and Auto Body
College and Additional Training:
• One-year certificate program in automotive technology
• Associate, Bachelors, or Masters Degree in automotive technology
Comments:
You’ll have two options in this program; auto technician or auto servicing. The auto technician student will learn theory, science, math/
geometry, chemistry and physics as applied to the modern automobile, as well as participate in applied shop activities. The auto service
student will spend more time in the shop, learning mechanical and cosmetic maintenance, management procedures, and the operation of
the service and salvage business. Both options provide the opportunity for instruction in the eight ASE certification areas, but content will
vary in depth. One option will help you be immediately employable while one option will provide you with a distinct advantage over those
students continuing their education beyond the secondary level. The choice will depend upon your future goals and ability. The instructors
will help you decide which option is best for you!
ASE Training Available
College Credit from LLCC available • See CACC Instructor or Principal for further information
9
Collision Repair Technology
Program Length: Two years
What You’ll Be Able To Do:
• Repair damaged vehicles
• Paint vehicles
• MIG welding
• Repair plastics and adhesives
Academic Connection:
Collision Repair Technology students must understand basic math
for estimating and flat rate labor time calculation. They must pos-
sess excellent communications skills to interface with customers
and function in sales and management.
Typical Jobs to Start Your Career:
• Auto Body Painter
• Auto Body Repairer
• Sales Representative
• Parts Clerk
• Used Car Re-conditioner
Employers of CACC Students from This Program:
• Dick’s Auto Body
• Call’s Auto Body
• Zara’s Collision Center
• Kulavic’s Auto body
• Kim’s Auto Body & Paint
• Fenstermaker & Son
• Bob Matthews Auto Body
• Collision Craft

College and Additional Training:
• Two-year technical degree in auto body technology
• Certificate of completion in auto body
Comments:
This course is not designed for those enrolling because their vehicle needs
some work. However, if you want to learn the skills required for entry-
level positions as an auto body technician, be sure to sign up for Collision
Repair Technology! You’ll get actual hands-on experience working on a
number of customer service cars. LLCC students can enroll in the Cen-
ter’s Auto Body program.
College Credit from LLCC available
See CACC Instructor or Principal for further information
10
Power Equipment Technology
Program Length: Two Years
What you’ll be Able to Do:
• Diagnose, repair and maintain engines in all applications of automotive,
agriculture, industrial, and recreational vehicles.
• Repair manual and power transmissions and brake systems
• Understand air conditioning and repair
• Perform electrical diagnose and repair
• Understand hydraulics and complete repairs
• Perform all types of welding including MIG, SMAW, Oxy/ Acetylene, TIG,
and Plasma
• Operate all types of small and large hand tools, power equipment and
measuring equipment
• Operate automotive and industrial painting refinishing equipment
• Understand various equipment used in this area including automotive,
heavy truck, agriculture and industrial applications
• Demonstrate computer skills on Windows XP, internet, and research docu-
ments
• Participate in FFA and Skills USA student organizations
Academic Connection:
Power Equipment Technology students must understand and be able to use math and science concepts to repair and diagnose mechanical
systems. They must possess communication skills to read manuals, operate computers, follow instructions, and talk to customers.
Typical Jobs to Start Your Career:
• Recreational vehicles sales and service • Fabrication shop
• Automotive industry • Welder
• Heavy Equipment Technician • Trucking industry
• Painting and refinishing • Equipment, parts, sales
• Lawn and Garden equipment companies • Manufacturing companies
• Self-employed mechanic • Millwright, Ironworker
• Agricultural equipment mechanic
Employers of CACC Students from This Program:
• Carver’s Westside Power Equipment • TRD motorsports
• Crossroads Ford • Altofer/ Caterpillar Machinery
• Bobcat of Springfield • The Rail Gold Course
• Area Mechanic Shops • Mervis Iron
• Truck Centers • Beatty Equipment
• Landmark Ford • IDOT
• Sears Automotive
College and Additional Training:
• Two-year technical degree in Power Equipment Technology
• Four-year degree in Power Equipment-Agricultural-Industrial Technology
• Two-year degree in Agricultural Business Management at LLCC
• Two-year Technical degree in Fertilizer Occupations at LLCC
Comments:
Power Equipment Technicians are currently in very high demand. Employers are in a critical state needing quality technicians to perform
the tasks needed to maintain and grow in the future. If you apply yourself and learn the skills needed to meet industrial challenges the em-
ployment world is full of opportunities. If you apply yourself and learn the skills needed you can enter the labor force a step ahead by having
college credit and various certifications.
ASE and NCCER Certification Available
Dual College Credit from LLCC available • See CACC Instructor or Principal for further information
11
Aviation Technology
Program length: Two years
What the student will be able to do:
• Prepare for a career in maintenance and repair of aircraft
• Prepare for acceptance into a post secondary program for A & P mechanic
• Learn about how to perform airworthy work on airframe’s
• Learn about repair of aircraft power plants
• Learn about repair of flight controls
• Learn about FAA approved maintenance and repair procedures
• Learn proper use of hand tools and equipment to repair aircraft
• Work on actual aircraft systems
• Perform acceptable results on aircraft systems
• Understand the characteristics of heavier than air machines
• Learn about electrical and electronics systems repair
Academic connections and relativity:
Students applying and enrolling in this program must have good science, math,
and comprehension skills. Certain manual skills and dexterity skills are impor-
tant. Use of computer, research, service manuals, reasoning skills and of course
communication skills with peers and supervisors is necessary to be successful in
this career field.
Typical jobs, hobbies and interests to help in beginning a career in this field:
• Building and flying model aircraft
• Working with and around real flying aircraft
• Mechanical aptitude interests and skills
• Working with fixed based operators at local airports
Employers of CACC students from this program:
• Local FBO’s at airports
• Regional airlines
• Private companies operating corporate aircraft
• 1st Class Air at Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport
• United Air lines
• Bloomington, Decatur, and St. Louis FBO’s.
College and Post Secondary programs:
Lincoln Land Community College A & P one and two year programs for A & P Certification. Aircraft maintenance and repair with the
Illinois Air National Guard or with the United States Air Force, and the Illinois Department of Aeronautics
Comments:
Student success in this program will lead them to a good paying job in any location around the world. This field is one of the most highly
paid and seriously regarded mechanical fields in existence due to the high regard for safety in flight, from commercial, military, and civilian
uses and needs for aviation.
See LLCC program guidelines, Federal Aviation Administration, or Illinois Department of Aeronautics for additional details and information
See CACC Instructor or Principal for further information
12
In form ation
Te chnol ogy &
Com munic ations
Communications & Media • Cisco Networking Academy • Microsoft Office Academy
13
Communications and Media: Graphic Arts
Program Length: Two years
What You’ll Be Able to Do:
• Design and layout graphic materials/publications using the latest industry-standard Macintosh-based computer applications
• Use a computer for typesetting
• Understand typography and its uses
• Produce line photography using a process camera and darkroom
• Learn how to strip up line negatives
• Produce printing plates using a plate burner
• Run a sheet-fed printing press
• Perform bindery operations
• Learn how to design Macintosh-based Web pages
• Run a vinyl cutting machine
Academic Connection:
Students use applied communication, math and science skills in all areas of the Graphic Arts labs. Students will use software applications
including: Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe InDesign, QuarkXPress and will also learn to use Hypertext Markup Language
(HTML). Good communication skills are essential. Classes make extensive use of student teams, student supervisors and hands-on proj-
ects. Students may participate in job shadowing, internships, early employment, and community projects.
Typical Jobs to Start Your Career:
• Advertising/Public Relations • Graphic Arts Photographer
• Typesetter • Printing Press Operator
• Illustrator • Printing Equipment Repair
• Production Artist • Bindery Worker
• Graphic Designer • Web Page Designer
• Art Director • Web Master
• Stripper/Platemaker
Employers of CACC Students from this Program:
• SIU School of Medicine • Secretary of State’s Office
• Color World of Printing • The State of Illinois
• Minuteman Printing • Overnight Sign Company
• Production Express • Vinyl It Graphics
• Drag News Magazine • The Vinyl Guy
• HIP Advertising • Lilly Sign Company
• Metal Décor • University of Illinois at Springfield
• G.M. Anderson & Associates Advertising • St. John’s Hospital
• The State Journal-Register • Memorial Medical Center
• H&W Advertising • Byers Printing
14
College and Additional Training:
Students who attend Graphic Arts class for two years can receive 12 credits at the Art Institutes of Illinois/Schaumburg and may be able to
receive credits at other colleges, universities and technical institutes. A two or four year technical degree in fields such as advertising, visual
art, and printing technology is also recommended for those choosing to continue their education.
Comments:
Students in the Graphic Arts class develop their skills through the operation of the computer, design, and printing press labs. There is a
growing demand for skilled and motivated employees in all of the graphic arts areas. The graphic arts industry continues to be among the
top employers in the U.S. There is a constant demand for individuals who are well educated and motivated for entry-level positions in the
printing field. Professional certification is available through the Graphic Arts class.
See CACC Instructor or Principal for further details
15
Communications and Media: Radio-TV
Program Length: Two years
What You’ll Be Able To Do:
Radio Broadcasting
• Operate WQNA 88.3 FM Springfield
• Operate www.WQNA.org
• Audio Production and Sound Technology
• Digital Audio Editing and Mixing
• Music Research and Scheduling
• Announcing
• News and Sports Reporting
• Electronic News Gathering (Radio)
• Amateur (Ham) Radio Operator
• Society of Broadcast Engineers – Radio Operator
Television Broadcasting
• Operate CACC TV Studio, Produce Illinois Student News Network
programs & Operate www.ILSN.net
• Video Production, Light & Visual Technology
• Television Production Skills including: Lighting, Camera Opera-
tions, Floor Managing, Audio, Technical Directing,Character
Generation, Special Effects, & Producing-Directing
• Digital Video Editing
• Electronic News Gathering (TV)
• Society of Broadcast Engineers – TV Control Room Operator
Academic Connection:
Students use applied communication, math, science, fine arts, and social studies skills—to meet state academic standards. Students re-
ceive rigorous reading, writing and math coaching. Radio-TV classes incorporate math skills in algebra, statistics, and geometry. Students
produce written and oral communications products to meet broadcast industry standards in grammar, spelling and style. CACC students
explore career development and practice workplace skills through lab work, off campus projects, job shadowing, internships and placement
with area employers.
Typical Jobs to Start Your Career:
• Radio Disc Jockey • TV Camera Operator
• Radio Promotions Assistant • TV Floor Manager
• Audio Producer • TV Audio Director
• Sports Reporter • TV Control Room Technician
• Telecommunications Tech • Video Editor
• Radio and TV Journalist • Copywriter
• Sales and Marketing Assistant TV Floor Manager • Web Site Developer
16
Employers of CACC Radio-TV Graduates:
• Capitol Radio Group, Saga Communications
• WTAX, WDBR, WYMG, WQQL, WABZ
• Neuhoff Communications Inc.
• WFMB AM, WFMB, WCVS, WXAJ
• Mid-West Family Broadcasting
• WMAY, WQLZ, WNNS,WLCE
• WLDS-WEAI Jacksonville
• WJIL-WJVO Jacksonville
• WTIM-WMKR Taylorville
• WLUJ Petersburg
• WIBI Carlinville
• WUIS-WIPA Public Radio Springfield
• Illinois Radio Network
• WICS Newschannel 20 Springfield
• WAND TV Decatur
• WCIA-WCFN TV Champaign
• WBUI TV Decatur
• WSEC TV Springfield
• Insight Cable TV
• Illinois Channel
• Lincoln Land C.C., Library Media
• University of Illinois at Springfield, TV Office
• Memorial Medical Center, Media Dept.
• St. John’s Hospital, Media Center
• SIU School of Medicine, Biomedical Communications
• State of Illinois, CMS Telecommunications,
• Dept. of Revenue Training and Education
• Illinois National Guard
College and Additional Training:
For the past five years, more than 70% of Communications & Me-
dia students have been enrolled in post-secondary programs follow-
ing graduation from high school. Students may receive advanced
college credit at colleges, art and broadcast schools and universities.
Comments:
Students in the Radio-TV classes develop real world skills through the operation of WQNA Radio 88.3 FM Springfield, WQNA.ORG web
streaming, the Center’s TV studios, the Illinois Student News Network – ILSN.net, and by producing audio, video, and internet products.
Various professional certifications may be also obtained. Instructors assist students in obtaining entry level jobs in broadcasting and media
production throughout the Capital area.
See CACC Instructor or Principal for further details
17
Communications and Media: Photography
Program Length: Two years
What You’ll Be Able To Do:
• Chemical / Electronic Photography
• Operate cameras including: 35mm, medium format, and
large format
• Process film, Black and white and color. Negative and
positive
• Calculate and formulate chemical solutions for processing
photographic material
• Produce photographic prints; black and white and color
• Study legal issues (model release and copy right law)
• Learn how to establish a personal photography business
• Learn news and sports photography
• Learn portraiture techniques
• Landscape photography
• Study advertising/commercial photography
• Operate underwater cameras
• Learn lighting techniques for still photography
• Use electronic photographic capture equipment
• Operate an electronic SLR camera
• Use computer work stations to transfer, record and manipulate images
• Utilize electronic imaging and photo enhancement programs
Academic Connection:
Students use applied communication, math, science, fine arts, and social studies skills to meet state standards. Students receive rigorous
reading, writing and math coaching. Photography classes incorporate math skills in algebra, statistics, geometry chemistry and science.
Students produce visual written and oral communications products to industry standards in grammar, spelling and style. Students also
expand on their practical knowledge of the sciences with exercises in: electricity and electron


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