• Introduction to Management


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    • Abstract: BMA101Introduction to ManagementSemester 2, 2006This unit will be offered in:Hobart & LauncestonThe lecturing team responsible will be:Dr Jackie Wellen (Lecturer-in-Charge)Room: 315 (Hobart)Phone: 6226 2409

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BMA101
Introduction to Management
Semester 2, 2006
This unit will be offered in:
Hobart & Launceston
The lecturing team responsible will be:
Dr Jackie Wellen (Lecturer-in-Charge)
Room: 315 (Hobart)
Phone: 6226 2409
Email: [email protected]
Megan Woods
Room: 314 (Hobart)
Phone: 6226 7189
Email: [email protected]
Kim Lehman
Room: A266 (Launceston)
Phone: 6324 3001
Email: [email protected]
http://www.utas.edu.au/mgmt/student.htm
Introduction to the Unit
This unit provides students with an introduction to management concepts, functions and strategies.
The unit is structured into three key themes that deal with the functions of management, the context of
management, and the practice of management. The semester starts by looking at the evolution of management
theory and the four key functions of management: planning, organising, leading, and controlling. The unit
then explores the context in which managers operate, including an analysis of the broad environment in which
organisations operate, the internal dynamics of organisational life, and the ethical climate that underpins
sound management. The final component of the unit examines specific issues associated with the practice of
management, including human resource management, and communication. This unit provides an opportunity
to gain an overview of management theory, context, and practice and serves as a basis for further detailed
study of the elements that contribute to successful management.
In addition to the content outlined above, this unit will also include a strong focus on general skills and
abilities associated with conducting literature research and communicating effectively in an academic setting.
Several skill development workshops will be administered during lectures throughout the semester. These
workshops are designed to introduce students to basic concepts and applied skills in conducting academic
research, including information literacy skills, the critical analysis and synthesis of academic sources of
information, and the ability to use research to support the development and communication of an argument.
The skill-based component of the unit provides an opportunity for students to gain a solid grounding in the
research and writing skills that are critical for achievement in undergraduate academic study.
WebCT Vista software will be incorporated into delivery of the unit to enhance the learning experience by
providing access to up to date course materials and by allowing for online discussion through this web-based
environment. Students are strongly encouraged to pose questions about material online in WebCT rather than
emailing the lecturers and tutors directly: this will allow everyone in the unit a chance to participate. General
information on using WebCT at University of Tasmania is available on:
http://www.utas.edu.au/coursesonline/. Log on: http://vista.utas.edu.au/ using your University email and
password (access will be activated at the beginning of the semester). We hope that you will enjoy the
opportunity of experiencing the impact of Internet technology in the educational environment and look
forward to your active participation.
It is important to note that the School of Management recognises and adopts the University of Tasmania's
guidelines in regard to ensuring access and equity for all students. If the inclusion of WebCT learning presents
challenges to your personal learning needs and you feel that you may be disadvantaged, we encourage you to
seek advice and, if necessary, assistance from University staff. Recognising that students may wish to
maintain confidentiality in regard to these matters, we suggest that you either contact your Tutor, the Lecturer-
in-Charge, or the University's Disability Advisor (Student Services) to discuss these issues.
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this unit, you should have attained the following:
Knowledge of:
• Major theories of management and their development over time
• The main functions of management
• The context of management
• The practice of management
• Key national and international issues in management
The ability to conduct academic research, including:
• The ability to use the library catalogue and databases to search for academic publications
• The ability to differentiate between, and understand the uses of, academic and non-academic sources of
information
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• The ability to review and critically analyse published research
The ability to use academic literature to support the development and communication of an argument,
including:
• The ability to present a logical and coherent argument using written expression
• The ability to use academic sources of information to support an argument
• The ability to correctly attribute information sources conforming with the School of Management
referencing standards
Generic Graduate Attributes
The University has defined a set of generic graduate attributes (GGAs) that can be expected of all graduates
(see http://www.utas.edu.au/tl/policies/index.htm). By undertaking this unit you should make progress in
attaining the following attributes:
Knowledge
• Students will develop an understanding of the major theories underlying the principles of management
and their development over time
• Students will be made aware of the complexities of the total environment in which management must take
place
• Students will be exposed to the major functions of management practice and the skills necessary to be an
effective manager
Communication Skills
• Students will be exposed to the major components of communication and will be required to demonstrate
an ability to use communication skill both orally in tutorials and through a written assignment
Problem Solving Skills
• Through assessment tasks, students will be required to exercise problem solving skills as they relate to the
practice of management
Global Perspective
• Students will be made aware of the impact of global factors on management, both economic and cultural
and the impact of the global environment in which management takes place
Social Responsibility
• The implications of acting ethically in management forms part of the material for the unit and the need to
be ethical and socially responsible is incorporated into each section of the unit
Prerequisites
None.
Texts
Prescribed Text
Samson, D. & Daft, R. L. 2005. Fundamentals of management (Pacific Rim 2nd ed.). Victoria: Thomson.
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School Publications
Students must obtain the following electronic publications which are available from the School of
Management website:
http://www.utas.edu.au/mgmt/student.htm
Writing Assignments: A Guide
School of Management Referencing Style
Recommended Reading
The publications listed below are highly recommended for further reading on the topics covered in the unit.
Books
There are a large number of general introductory texts for management studies, many of them emanating from
the United States. See for example:
Bateman, T.S. & Snell, S.A. 2002. Management (5th ed.). Chicago: Irwin
Daft, R.L. 2000. Management (5th ed.). Fort Worth: Dryden
Dessler, G. 1995. Managing organisations in an era of change. Fort Worth: Dryden
Hellriegel, D. Jackson, S.E. & Slocum, J.A., 1999. Management (8th ed.). Cincinnati: South-Western College
Kreitner, R. 2001. Management (8th ed.). Boston: Houghton Miffin
Schermerhorn, J.R. 2001. Management (6th ed.). New York: Wiley
Books with an Australian or Pacific Rim focus include:
Bartol, K., Martin, D., Tein, M. & Matthews, G. 2001. Management. A Pacific rim focus (3rd ed.). Sydney:
McGraw Hill.
Collins, R. & McLaughlin, Y. 1996. Effective management (2nd ed.). Sydney: CCH Australia
Davidson, P. & Griffin, R.W. 2003. Management. An Australian perspective (2nd ed.) Brisbane: Wiley
Robbins, S.P., Bergman, R., Stagg, I. & Coulter, M. 2003. Management (3rd ed.). Frenchs Forest: Pearson
Education
Schermerhorn, J. R., Campling, J., Poole, D. & Wiesner, R. 2003. Management: An Asia-Pacific perspective.
QLD: Wiley & Sons.
Samson, D. & Daft, R. 2003. Management. Pacific Rim Edition. Victoria: Thomson.
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Journals and Periodicals
Apart from books, you will find it valuable to get into the practice of reading relevant articles from journals
and periodicals (including newspapers and magazines).
For your studies in management it is essential that you become familiar with some journals in the discipline
such as JANZAM (the Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management), Harvard
Business Review and the Academy of Management Journal. Note that not all periodical and journals are
available from the University of Tasmania libraries. Many journals are now available electronically.
It is also very useful to read regularly popular business publications such as Business Review Weekly (BRW)
and articles on business in the daily newspapers, especially those dedicated to business such as the Australian
Financial Review.
Flexible Learning: WebCT Vista
WebCT software has been incorporated into the delivery of this unit to enhance the learning experience by
providing access to up to date course materials and by allowing for online discussion through this web based
environment.
The School of Management has prepared a WebCT Information Sheet which includes access guidelines and
contact information. It is available to download as a word document from the School of Management website:
http://www.utas.edu.au/mgmt/student.htm
Privacy Policy and Notice
The School of Management takes the utmost care to protect the privacy and security of your personal
information and to ensure its accuracy.
If you have any concerns about your privacy in WebCT please contact the lecturer-in-charge of this unit or
view the University of Tasmania WebCT Privacy Policy Statement available from the university website on
http://www.utas.edu.au/coursesonline/privacy/index.html.
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Assessment
In order to pass this unit you must achieve an overall mark of at least 50 per cent of the total available marks.
Details of each item of Coursework are provided in the Assignment Topics section.
Method of Assessment Value Due Date Length*
Coursework
Journal Exercise 20 25th August 1250 words (maximum)
Written Assignment 30 29th September 2000 words (maximum)
Examination 50 Exam Period 2 hours
Total Marks 100
* Word Limit: The word count includes such items as headings, in-text references, quotes and executive
summaries. It does not include the reference list at the end of the assignment.
Reading Week
All undergraduate units offered by the School of Management are scheduled to include a Reading Week. The
dates for this Semester are shown in the attached Study Schedule.
The purpose of the Reading Week is to allow students an opportunity to consolidate their studies thus far, and
to research coming assignments.
Examination
Format
The two (2) hour examination is worth 50 marks for this unit, and is a closed book exam.
The examination will comprise 2 sections. Section A will feature 40 multiple-choice/true-false questions
worth 20 marks in total. Section B will comprise 3 short answer questions from a choice of 6, worth 10 marks
each.
A ballpoint pen is the only item you will need to bring to this exam. The best preparation for the exam is
consistent work throughout the semester.
Scheduled date and place
Your final examination for this unit will be held during the scheduled examination period as indicated by
Student Administration in correspondence to you.
Examinations will normally be scheduled Monday to Saturday inclusive. Examinations may be held during he
day or evening and students should consult the university information which will be made available towards
the end of semester.
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You are advised to make any necessary arrangements with employers now for time off during examination
period to sit this examination. Your participation at the scheduled time is not negotiable unless there are
exceptional circumstances.
Note that you will be expected to sit the examination at your recorded study centre.
Supplementary Examination
Except in special circumstances and on the recommendation of the lecturer-in-charge or the Head of School, a
student who fails will not be granted a supplementary examination.
Submission of Coursework
Lodging Coursework
All Coursework must have the School of Management Assignment Cover Sheet and Title Page attached. Both
of which are available as a blank template from the School of Management website:
http://www.utas.edu.au/mgmt/student.htm
Please remember that you are responsible for lodging your Coursework on or before the due date. We suggest
you keep a copy. Even in the most ‘perfect’ of systems, items sometimes go astray.
Note that you may also be required to submit an electronic copy of your Coursework. More details of this will
be given in Lectures.
Hobart students: Lodge in assignment box at room 316, Commerce & Economics Building.
Launceston students: Lodge in assignment box beside room A170.
All coursework must be handed in at 2.00 p.m. on the due date.
Late Coursework
Written Work
Extensions will only be granted on medical or compassionate grounds and will not be granted because of
work or other commitments. Requests for extensions should be made in writing to the lecturer-in-charge
prior to the due date. Medical certificates or other evidence must be attached and must contain information
which justifies the extension sought.
Late assignments which have not been granted an extension will, at the lecturer’s discretion, be penalised by
deducting ten per cent of total marks for each full day overdue.
Assignments submitted more than six days late will normally not be accepted by the lecturer-in-charge.
Tests
Students who are unable to sit a test on medical or compassionate grounds (work or other commitments are
not considered 'compassionate grounds') may request that they be permitted to submit alternative Coursework.
Please do not expect a special test to be held for you if you choose to go on holidays or undertake other
activities on the scheduled date. If you do need to request alternative Coursework, you should do so in writing
to the lecturer-in-charge prior to the due date. Medical certificates or other evidence must be attached and
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must contain information which justifies the request. The telephone number of the doctor should also be
included.
Return of Coursework
Coursework will be returned during classes or it can be collected from the lecturer’s or tutor’s room at
nominated times; it will not be available from the School’s offices.
Plagiarism
Plagiarism is a form of cheating. It is taking and using someone else’s thoughts, writings or inventions and
representing them as your own, for example:
• using an author’s words without putting them in quotation marks and citing the source;
• using an author’s ideas without proper acknowledgment and citation; or
• copying another student’s work.
If you have any doubts about how to refer to the work of others in your assignments, please consult
your lecturer or tutor for relevant referencing guidelines, and the academic integrity resources on the web at
http://www.utas.edu.au/tl/supporting/academicintegrity/index.html.
The intentional copying of someone else’s work as one’s own is a serious office punishable by penalties that
may range from a fine or deduction/cancellation of marks and, in the most serious of cases, to exclusion from
a unit, a course or the University. Details of penalties that can be imposed are available in the Ordinance of
Student Discipline—Part 3 Academic Misconduct, see
http://www.utas.edu.au/universitycouncil/legislation/ord9.pdf
The University reserves the right to submit (or to require you to submit) assignments to online
plagiarism detection software, and might then retain a copy of the assignment on its database for the
purpose of future plagiarism checking.
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Tutorial Program
Tutorial Questions for Discussion
Note that the tutorial program does not start until Week 2 of semester.
The purpose of the Tutorial Program is to build on and develop your understanding of the text, the session
resources available via WebCT Vista, and the lecture material. The tutorial program is based on learning
exercises that include the use of the tutorial questions outlined below, as well as research instruments, videos and
analysis of real life work situations. Students are required to prepare answers to set questions for each tutorial.
Whilst the approach adopted by individual tutors may differ all tutorials will consider the tutorial questions for
discussion in one form or another.
For the tutorial program to be effective, it is expected that students will have read the relevant material and have
prepared written responses to the tutorial questions.
Week 2—The changing paradigm of management
• What similarities do you see among the four management functions of planning, organising, leading and
controlling? Are the functions related?
• What is the difference between efficiency and effectiveness? Which is more important for performance?
Can an organisation succeed in both simultaneously?
• Describe the characteristics of the new management paradigm. How do these characteristics compare to
those of an organisation in which you have worked? Would you like to work or manage in a learning
organisation? Discuss.
Week 3—Historical foundations of the learning organisation
• Why is it important to understand the different perspectives and approaches to management theory
that have evolved throughout the history of organisations?
• Why can an event such as the Hawthorne studies be a major turning point in the history of
management even if the idea is later shown to be in error? Discuss
• How do societal forces influence the practice and theory of management? Do you think management
techniques are a response to these forces?
• Which of the six characteristics of the learning organisation do you find the most appealing? Which
would be the hardest for you to adopt?
Week 4—Management function: Planning and decision-making
• What are the characteristics of an effective goal? Would it be better to have no goals at all than to
have goals that do not meet these criteria?
• Which is more important – strategy formulation or strategy implementation? Do they depend on each
other? Is it possible for strategy implementation to occur first?
• Why is decision making considered a fundamental part of management effectiveness?
• Why are many decisions made by groups rather than by individuals?
• What is meant by satisficing and bounded rationality? Why do managers not strive to find the
economically best solution for many organisational decisions?
• What techniques could you use to improve your own creativity and effectiveness in decision making?
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Week 5—Management function: Organising
• Many experts note that organisations have been making greater use of teams in recent years. What
factors might account for this trend?
• Some people argue that the matrix structure should be adopted only as a last resort because the dual
chains of command can create more problems than they solve. Do you agree or disagree? Why?
• What is the network approach to structure? Is the use of authority and responsibility different
compared with other forms of departmentalisation? Explain.
• Contrast centralisation with span of management. Would you expect these characteristics to affect
each other in organisations? Why?
Week 6—Management function: Leading
• Do you think leadership style is fixed and unchangeable for a leader or flexible and adaptable?
• What is the difference between trait theories and behavioural theories of leadership?
• Would you prefer working for a leader who has a consideration style or an initiating-structure
leadership style? Discuss the reasons for your answer.
• What is transformational leadership. Differentiate between transformational leadership and
transactional leadership. Give an example of each.
Week 7—Reading Week
Week 8—Management function: Controlling
• Why is it important for managers to understand the process of organisational control?
• How might the manager of a family-style restaurant use concurrent controls to ensure that the restaurant
is providing customers with the highest quality food and service? What feedback controls could be
useful?
• Would you like to work for a company that uses open-book management? Would you like to be a
manager in the company? Why or why not?
• Why is it important for an organisation’s control system to be linked to its overall strategy?
Week 9—Management context: The internal and external environment
• What are the major elements of the general environment? Give examples.
• What are the major elements of the task environment? Give examples.
• What forces influence organisational uncertainty? Would such forces typically orginate in the task or
the general environment?
• Define corporate culture and explain its importance for managers.
Week 10—Management context: The ethical climate
• Compare and contrast the utilitarian approach with the moral rights approach to ethical decision making.
Which do you believe is the best for managers to follow? Why?
• Is it socially responsible for organisations to undertake political activity or join with others in a trade
association to influence the government? Discuss.
• From where do managers derive ethical values? What can managers do to help define ethical standards
for the organisation?
• Do you think a code of ethics combined with an ethics committee would be more effective than
leadership for implementing ethical behaviour? Discuss.
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Week 11—Management context: Change and development
• What are internal and external forces for change? Which force do you think is the major cause of
• organisational change?
• Why do organisations experience resistance to change? What techniques can managers use to
overcome resistance?
• Define the roles associated with an idea champion. Why are ideas champions so essential to the
initiation of change?
• Do the underlying values of OD differ from assumptions associated with other types of change?
Discuss.
Week 12 ⎯ Management practice: Human Resource Management
• How can the HR activities of planning, recruiting, performance appraisal and compensation be
related to corporate strategy?
• How might the changing social contract affect the ways HR departments recruit, develop and retain
workers?
• What techniques can managers adopt to improve their recruiting and interviewing practices?
• How does affirmative action differ from equal employment opportunity in recruiting and selection?
Week 13—Management practice: Communication
• Is speaking accurately or listening actively the more important communication skill for managers?
• What would you include in a training program to help managers become better communicators?
• What is the relationship between group communication and group task? For example, how should
communications differ in a strategic planning group and a group of employees who stock shelves in a
grocery store?
Review
Overview of the course and exam preparation.
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Assignment Topics
Journal Exercise
Due Date: Friday 25th August 2.00pm
Length: 1250 words (maximum)
Value: 20 marks
Description
This aim of this assignment is to introduce you to the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to conduct
academic research. These are core skills required in the academic study of management, and they are used by
managers to evaluate and synthesise knowledge to inform management practice. The Skill Development
Workshops conducted during Weeks 3-5 of semester relate specifically to the requirements of the Journal
Exercise. It is strongly recommended that students attend all Skill Development Workshops.
The requirements of this assignment relate to the following learning objectives (refer to pages 2 and 3 of the
unit outline):
• The ability to use the library catalogue and databases to search for academic publications
• The ability to differentiate between, and understand the uses of, academic and non-academic sources
of information
• The ability to review and critically analyse published research
• The ability to correctly attribute information sources in accordance with the School of Management
referencing standards
Requirements
Part A – Review and Analysis of your Selected Journal Article
The first part of the assignment requires you to find an academic journal publication, correctly reference the
publication, and provide a brief review and critical analysis of the article.
To complete Part A, you will need to do each of the following:
1. Find an academic journal publication
You will need to use the library catalogue and databases to find an academic publication relating to
ONE of the essay topics (refer to page 14 of the unit outline). You will be provided with knowledge
and skills relating to this section of the assignment in the Skill Development Workshop on
information literacy in Week 3.
2. Correctly reference the academic journal publication
You will need to use the School of Management Referencing Guidelines (available at
http://www.utas.edu.au/mgmt/student.htm) to provide correct in-text and reference list citations
for the article you selected. As proof of your ability to locate critical student resources for use in
BMA101, you are required to submit a hard-copy of the School of Management Referencing
Guidelines with your assignment. You will be provided with knowledge and skills relating to this
section of the assignment in the Skill Development Workshop on academic referencing, plagiarism,
and collusion in Week 5.
3: Review and critically analyse the journal publication
You are required to provide a brief overview of the topic the article deals with, the strengths and
weaknesses of the research, and a discussion of how the article contributes to management theory
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and/or practice. You will be provided with knowledge and skills relating to this section of the
assignment in the Skill Development Workshop on reviewing academic publications in Week 4.
Part B – Review and Analysis of Designated Journal Article
Part B requires you to provide a review and critique of a designated journal article. A designated article for
each of the essay topics will be made available on WebCT (“Journal Exercise” folder).
To complete Part B, you will need to do each of the following:
1. Download the article that relates to your selected essay topic (refer to page 14 of the unit
outline).
Access the articles via WebCT (“Journal Exercise” folder). Note that Part B requires you to
complete a review and analysis of ONE of the designated journal articles. You are NOT required
to submit a hard copy of the designated journal article.
2. Correctly reference the designated journal article
As in Part A, use the School of Management Referencing Guidelines (available at
http://www.utas.edu.au/mgmt/student.htm) to provide a correct reference for the designated
article.
3: Review and critically analyse the designated journal article
Provide a brief overview of the topic the designated article deals with, the strengths and
weaknesses of the research, and discuss how the article contributes to management theory and/or
practice.
Important Information on Completing the Journal Exercise
You will be provided with response sheet on which to complete the Journal Exercise. Download an electronic
version of the Journal Exercise response sheet from WebCT (“Journal Exercise” folder). You will be able to
complete your assignment using a word processing program (i.e., MS Word), and then print a completed hard
copy for submission.
Your assignment should include the following:
• A copy of your selected article
• A completed Journal Exercise Response Sheet
• A copy of the School of Management Referencing Guidelines
• An assignment title page and cover sheet (available from Level 3 Commerce Building)
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Essay Assignment
Due Date: Friday 29th September 2.00pm
Length: 2000 words maximum
Value: 30 marks
Description
The essay assignment develops the research, analysis, and writing skills you gained from completing the
Journal Exercise assignment by applying them to writing an academic essay. The Skill Development
Workshops delivered throughout semester are designed to provide you with knowledge, skills, and abilities
that are relevant to this task.
The requirements of this assignment relate to the following learning objectives:
• The ability to use the library catalogue and databases to search for academic publications
• The ability to differentiate between, and understand the uses of, academic and non-academic sources
of information
• The ability to review and critically analyse published research
• The ability to correctly attribute information sources that conforms with the School of Management
referencing standards
• The ability to present a logical and coherent argument using written expression
• The ability to use academic sources of information to support an argument
Requirements
This assignment requires you to construct an essay response to ONE of the following questions:
Topic 1: Informal Communication
Identify and describe the types of informal communication channels that exist in many organisations. Using
examples, discuss how informal communication channels can facilitate or hinder the effectiveness of
organisational communication.
Topic 2: Employee Resistance to Change
Discuss how employee resistance to change can impede the effectiveness of organisational change initiatives.
Using examples, describe the strategies managers can use to deal with employee resistance in the workplace.
Completing the assignment
Style Guide
In writing the essay, you are required to follow the proper academic style as outlined in the School of
Management website.
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Study Schedule
Semester 2, 2006
Week Start of Text Lecture Topic Skill Assessment
Week Chapter Development Due
Workshop
1 17 July 1 Introduction:
The functions of management
The context of management
The practice of management
2 24 July 2 Development of management ideas
Classical and contemporary
theories of management
3 31 July 6&8 Management function: Planning and Information
decision-making literacy skills
4 7 August 9 Management function: Organising Reviewing
academic
publications
5 14 August 12 Management function: Leading Academic
referencing,
plagiarism,
collusion
6 21 August 16 Management function: Controlling Journal Exercise
(due Friday 25th
August)
7 28 August Reading Week
Mid-Semester Break 4 September—10 September
8 11 3 Management context: The internal and Essay writing 1:
September external environment Researching and
writing an
academic essay
9 18 5 Management context: The ethical Essay writing 2:
September climate Planning and
executing an
essay
10 25 10 Management context: Change and Using the essay Written
September development marking criteria assignment
(due Friday 29th
September)
11 2 October 11 Management practice: Human resource
management
12 9 October 14 Management practice: Communication
13 16 October Overview Study skills and
exam preparation
A Calendar/Study Planner showing dates is available from School of Management offices.
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