• 9mm PISTOL


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B-GL-385-003/PT-001
WEAPONS
VOLUME 3
9mm PISTOL
(ENGLISH)
WARNING
ALTHOUGH NOT CLASSIFIED THIS PUBLICATION, OR ANY PART OF IT,
MAY BE EXEMPT FROM DISCLOSURE TO THE PUBLIC UNDER THE
ACCESS TO INFORMATION ACT. ANY ELEMENTS OF INFORMATION
CONTAINED HEREIN MUST BE CLOSELY SCRUTINIZED TO ASCERTAIN
WHETHER OR NOT THE PUBLICATION OR ANY PART OF IT MAY BE
RELEASED
Issued on Authority of the Chief of the Land Staff
OPI: Infantry School Small Arms Cell 2000-03-31
Amendments: AN1 2001-08-20
B-GL-385-003/PT-001
WEAPONS
VOLUME 3
9mm PISTOL
(ENGLISH)
WARNING
ALTHOUGH NOT CLASSIFIED THIS PUBLICATION, OR ANY PART OF IT,
MAY BE EXEMPT FROM DISCLOSURE TO THE PUBLIC UNDER THE
ACCESS TO INFORMATION ACT. ANY ELEMENTS OF INFORMATION
CONTAINED HEREIN MUST BE CLOSELY SCRUTINIZED TO ASCERTAIN
WHETHER OR NOT THE PUBLICATION OR ANY PART OF IT MAY BE
RELEASED
Issued on Authority of the Chief of the Land Staff
OPI: Infantry School Small Arms Cell 2000-03-31
9mm Pistol
FOREWORD
1. B-GL-385-003/PT-001, Weapons, Volume 3, 9mm Pistol is issued
on the authority of the Chief of the Land Staff.
2. It is effective upon receipt.
3. Suggestions for changes shall be forwarded through normal
channels to the Infantry School, Attention: C Stds O.
i
9mm Pistol
WEAPON SECURITY
The security of small arms and small arms ammunition is
your responsibility. Ensure your weapon(s) and
ammunition are secured/protected in accordance with
current orders and instructions.
WARNING
MISUSE OF WEAPONS, AMMUNITION AND EXPLOSIVES
PURPOSE
1. This order outlines Canadian Forces policy governing the use
or misuse of weapons, ammunition and explosives.
WEAPONS
2. Firing or attempting to fire locally manufactured weapons,
obsolete service or foreign weapons, or weapons used for display,
ceremonial or trophy purposes in museums, messes, parade grounds,
armouries or such like areas is prohibited except when specifically
authorizauthorized by NDHQ.
3. Attention is also drawn to the following references, which
concern offences related to the use or misuse of weapons:
a. National Defence Act, Section 117;
b. Criminal Code of Canada, Sections 82 to 106;
c. QR & O 103.59; and
d. CFP 128(1), Security Orders for the Canadian
Forces—Art. 5113 .
iii
B-GL-385-003/PT-001
AMMUNITION AND EXPLOSIVES
4. Tampering with or use of service and commercial
ammunition or explosives for other than their designed purpose is
prohibited.
5. Except as prescribed in paragraph 6, the modification,
breakdown or sectioning of live ammunition for experimental,
instructional or any other purpose or manufacture of explosives is
forbidden. This prohibition includes:
a. unauthorized interchange of fuses or primers or
both;
b. experiments with blank ammunition to alter the
powder charge or to introduce any other substance
into the cartridge case or into the weapon with the
approved cartridge;
c. experiments involving the use of altered propelling
charges or bursting charges with ammunition of any
type;
d. the use of any non-service or obsolete ammunition;
e. the use of foreign ammunition other than that
received through normal supply channels or supplied
in accordance with NATO Standardization
Agreements;
f. the manufacture and use of locally fabricated
explosive training devices, battle simulators,
saluting charges, etc.;
g. any alteration to the design of ammunition or
explosive devices;
h. deviations from authorized drills for use of
ammunition or explosive devices; and
i. rendering live ammunition inert for the use as
museum or instructional items.
iv
9mm Pistol
6. The prohibitions in paragraph 5 do not apply to:
a. authorized experiments, modifications, etc, carried
out by experimental, research, proof or inspection
establishments;
b. authorized breakdown, modification, repairs, proof
testing, etc., carried out as normal functions of a
Canadian Forces ammunition depot or base
ammunition facility;
c. personnel employed at Canadian Forces School of
Aerospace and Ordnance Engineering as instructors
or trainees under supervision, when breaking down
is carried out as part of a course training standard
and in accordance with an approved course training
plan;
d. the use for its designed role of commercial pattern
ammunition, which is obtained by local purchase as
specified in A-LM-137-000/LX-000 Preface to
Canadian Forces Catalogue of E2 Material or as
authorized by NDHQ in accordance with CFAO
36-19;
e. the use for its designed role of commercial pattern
ammunition which is taken into service and
catalogued;
f. hand-loading small arms ammunition in accordance
with CFAO 50-18; or
g. other cases, when specifically authorized by NDHQ.
v
9mm Pistol
TABLE OF CONTENTS
FOREWORD .................................................................................. i
MISUSE OF WEAPONS, AMMUNITION AND EXPLOSIVES
Purpose........................................................................................iii
Weapons......................................................................................iii
Ammunition and Explosives ....................................................... iv
CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION
General......................................................................................... 1
Background .................................................................................. 1
Format .......................................................................................... 2
Technical Data 9mm Pistol .......................................................... 2
Practice Periods............................................................................ 3
Classroom Drills .......................................................................... 4
Carriage Positions ........................................................................ 5
CHAPTER 2 LESSON PLANS—BASIC SKILLS
LESSON 1 INTRODUCTION................................................... 7
General......................................................................................... 7
Instructor Notes............................................................................ 7
Conduct of the Lesson.................................................................. 8
LESSON 2 STRIPPING, ASSEMBLING
AND CLEANING ................................................. 13
Instructor Notes.......................................................................... 13
Conduct of the Lesson................................................................ 14
LESSON 3 MAGAZINE FILLING, LOADING,
UNLOADING AND MAKING SAFE ................. 21
Instructor Notes.......................................................................... 21
Conduct of the Lesson................................................................ 22
vii
B-GL-385-003/PT-001
LESSON 4 HOLDING, AIMING AND FIRING .................... 26
Instructor Notes.......................................................................... 26
Conduct of the Lesson ............................................................... 27
LESSON 5 MECHANISM ...................................................... 35
Instructor Notes.......................................................................... 35
Conduct of the Lesson ............................................................... 36
LESSON 6 IMMEDIATE ACTION STOPPAGES................. 41
Instructor Notes.......................................................................... 41
Conduct of the Lesson ............................................................... 41
LESSON 7 FIRING POSITIONS ............................................ 45
Instructor Notes.......................................................................... 45
Conduct of the Lesson ............................................................... 45
CHAPTER 3 HANDLING TESTS AND FIRING
PRACTICES
SECTION 1 HANDLING TESTS ............................................. 53
Range Practices.......................................................................... 53
ANNEX A ALL ARMS AND SERVICES ANNUAL
PERSONAL WEAPON AND ALTERNATE
WEAPON HANDLING TESTS......................... 55
APPENDIX 1 TO ANNEX A
9mm BROWNING PISTOL—ALL ARMS AND
SERVICES ANNUAL PERSONAL WEAPON
TEST AND ALTERNATIVE PERSONAL
WEAPON ASSESSMENT ................................... 57
Annual Personal Weapon Test................................................. 587
Alternative Weapon Assessment ............................................... 58
ANNEX B 9mm BROWNING PISTOL............................... 61
APPENDIX 1 TO ANNEX B
9mm BROWNING PISTOL PERSONAL
WEAPONS TEST ................................................. 63
APPENDIX 2 TO ANNEX B ALTERNATIVE TEST..................... 65
viii
9mm Pistol
ANNEX C A GUIDE TO SHOOTING—CAUSES
OF INACCURATE SHOOTING
AND REMEDIES ................................................ 67
ANNEX D DRY—FIRE TESTING ...................................... 69
ANNEX E METHOD OF DESTRUCTION ........................ 71
Priority of Destruction ............................................................... 71
Guidelines Governing Destruction............................................. 71
Destruction................................................................................. 71
Disposal...................................................................................... 71
ANNEX F REFERENCES AND STANDARDIZATION
AGREEMENTS................................................... 73
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9mm Pistol
TABLE OF FIGURES
Figure 1-1: Service Pistol 9mm.................................................. 1
Figure 1-2: Carriage Position—Classroom Drills ...................... 5
Figure 1-3: Carriage Position—Normal ..................................... 6
Figure 2-1: Load Position......................................................... 10
Figure 2-2: Prepare for Inspection............................................ 11
Figure 2-3: Pistol Stripped ....................................................... 15
Figure 2-4: Cleaning Kit .......................................................... 19
Figure 2-5: Making the Pistol Ready........................................ 24
Figure 2-6: Holding the Pistol (One-hand Grip) ...................... 28
Figure 2-7: Holding the Pistol (Two-hand Grip)...................... 29
Figure 2-8: Positioning the Body (One-hand Grip).................. 30
Figure 2-9: Positioning the Body (Two-hand Grip) ................. 32
Figure 2-10: Correct Sight Picture ............................................. 33
Figure 2-11: Trigger Action ....................................................... 37
Figure 2-12: Action of the Magazine Platform .......................... 39
Figure 2-13: Kneeling, Two-Hand Hold .................................... 47
Figure 2-14: Sitting Position, Two-Hand Hold .......................... 47
Figure 2-14A: Sitting, Two-Hand Hold, legs crossed................... 48
Figure 2-15: Prone/Fire Trench Position, Two-Hand Hold........ 49
Figure 2-16: Alert Position—Standing....................................... 50
Figure 2-16A: Alert Position—Sitting .......................................... 50
Figure D-1: Dry-fire Testing ..................................................... 70
Figure E-1: Sectional View of the Service Pistol, 9mm,
in the Cocked Position (Left Side) ........................ 72
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9mm Pistol
CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION
GENERAL
1. This publication has been designed as a reference guide and a
manual for small arms instruction for use in the classroom and field
conditions. It is not intended as a reference for highly specialized
shooting techniques or for competitive shooting.
BACKGROUND
2. The service pistol was developed by the American inventor
John M. Browning. It was first manufactured by Fabrique Nationale
of Belgium in 1935 and marketed under the nomenclature "9 mm
Browning High-Power Pistol, 13 Shot." The Canadian forces
officially adopted the pistol in January 1944, and it has remained the
standard service pistol.
Figure 1-1: Service Pistol 9mm
B-GL-385-003/PT-001 1
9mm Pistol
FORMAT
3. The information in Chapter 2 is presented in the form of
lesson plans. This manual is laid out as follow:
a. Chapter 1 contains general information;
b. Chapter 2 contains the basic skills and specific
information; and
c. Chapter 3 contains handling tests and firing
practices.
TECHNICAL DATA 9mm PISTOL
4. Calibre. 9 mm.
5. Weight:
a. magazine loaded with 13 rounds—1.1 kg; and
b. magazine empty—1.0 kg.
6. Effective Range. 25 m.
7. Action. Recoil operated, locked breech, semi-automatic
8. Sights :
a. rear—fixed square notch;
b. foresight—laterally adjustable; and
c. tapered post.
9. Rate of Fire. Varies with the individual.
2 B-GL-385-003/PT-001
Introduction
PRACTICE PERIODS
10. General. All training must be progressive. Unnecessary
repetition is bad instructional practice. A soldier learns skills and facts
in the basic lessons, which should be taught only once during his
service. He then requires suitable practice in order to speed up his
actions and get the facts firmly fixed in his mind.
11. The sequence for each stage of a practice period is:
a. Remind. By explanation.
b. Assess Weaknesses. By practice or test.
c. Improve on Weakness. By practice.
d. Progressive Practice. By competitions.
12. The practice periods are intended as a guide to exercising
soldiers during their training. The instructor should plan the period as
an assessment of the soldiers' weak points.
13. Faults should be immediately brought to the attention of the
soldiers and corrected, otherwise soldiers will continue to make the
same mistakes.
14. If it becomes obvious during a practice period that the
soldiers have failed to grasp a particular skill or fact, the instructor will
have to teach that part of the basic lesson again.
15. Practice periods can be repeated according to the students'
progress. Instructors should remember that constant instruction and
practice without firing make the subject boring, and every effort
should be made to introduce live firing in the sequence as soon as it is
feasible.
16. Competition. The incentive of competition will always help
to make practice more interesting. The whole of a practice period can
be based on competitions, if the instructor so wishes. Some points on
forming competitions are as follows:
a. they may be on an individual or team basis;
B-GL-385-003/PT-001 3
9mm Pistol
b. if run on a team basis, the instructor must ensure that
the selection of teams are fair and equal in ability;
the more advanced members of each team will help
the weaker members;
c. marks can be awarded up to a given total, or start
with a total and deduct marks for mistakes as the
competition progresses;
d. a chart drawn on a chalkboard or a sheet of paper
should always be used to mark results;
e. further interest can always be generated by making
one team or individual watch another, criticising and
awarding or deducing marks in doing so; and
f. above all, the instructor must make certain that
competitions are simple and realistic, i.e., that they
exercise the soldiers in the facts and skills
concerning their training.
17. Master and Pupil. The master and pupil method of practice
in its simplest form is for one person (the pupil) to work under the
supervision of another (the master). The instructor keeps an eye on
both.
18. At all stages of training the master and pupil method of
practice stimulates interest, keenness and attention to detail. It is
particularly useful with large squads and in competitions. Used
regularly, it also develops initiative and leadership, and potential
leaders may well be discovered by watching the masters at work.
CLASSROOM DRILLS
19. Prior to the start of all lessons, number the class as
individuals or as groups of two as necessary. Ideally, there should be
no more than ten students per instructor. Each student and the
instructor should have a weapon.
4 B-GL-385-003/PT-001
Introduction
CARRIAGE POSITIONS
20. In this publication the pistol is shown being worn on the left
hip with no lanyard attached. This is done to facilitate the teaching of
drills. In normal circumstances, however, the pistol is worn on the
right hip. When the pistol is on the right hip, the lanyard should be
attached to the web belt directly behind the holster and, to prevent it
from catching on objects, should be tucked between the web belt and
the body.
Figure 1-2: Carriage Position—Classroom Drills
B-GL-385-003/PT-001 5
9mm Pistol
Figure 1-3: Carriage Position—Normal
6 B-GL-385-003/PT-001
9mm Pistol
CHAPTER 2
LESSON PLANS—BASIC SKILLS
LESSON 1
INTRODUCTION
GENERAL
INSTRUCTOR NOTES
1. Aim. To teach:
a. description;
b. safety precautions general;
c. supervised safety precautions; and
d. returning the pistol.
2. Time. One 40 minute period.
3. Method. A basic instructional period.
4. Stores:
a. pistol—1 per soldier;
b. web belt—1 per soldier;
c. magazine—2 per soldier; and
d. dummy round—1 round per soldier.
5. Preparation. The instructor will personally prove safe all
weapons and ammunition and explain the need for safety precautions
when handling the pistol.
B-GL-385-003/PT-001 7
9mm Pistol
6. Miscellaneous. When handling the pistol accessories or
parts, name them and identify their purpose. At this stage the student
is not expected to memorize all of the names.
CONDUCT OF THE LESSON
7. Characteristics. The 9 mm service pistol is a semi-
automatic, recoil operated, magazine fed, self-loading weapon that
fires the standard 9 mm NATO parabellum ammunition. It is
equipped with a manual operated safety catch and a magazine safety
feature.
8. Preliminaries:
a. clear your weapon and prove it to a student, then go
along and physically check all weapons and dummy
rounds; and
b. as you carry out the above, explain that since the
students have not had any training with this weapon,
the instructor must carry out the initial safety
precautions.
9. Review. Nil.
10. Introduction. The pistol is a light, semi-automatic weapon
and is intended primarily for short-range personal protection. It is
carried by those who would be unduly encumbered in the performance
of their duties by carrying a larger weapon.
11. Safety Precautions:
a. General. The following safety precautions must
always be followed:
(1) the pistol will always be proved safe prior
to handling;
(2) the pistol will be kept in its holster except
when drawn for use;
8 B-GL-385-003/PT-001
Lesson Plans—Basic Skills
(3) when drawn the pistol will be carried at the
load position;
(4) when a live magazine is placed in the
weapon, it will be pointed at the target area
before cocking;
(5) the pistol lanyard will always be removed
from the pistol during live firing, except for
those personnel who carry it as a personal
weapon--these personnel should fire the
classification practice with the lanyard on;
and
(6) all drills will be done with the pistol in the
shooter's right hand for both left and right
handed firers. Left handed shooters will
switch the pistol from the right hand to the
left hand on the order to fire and will return
the pistol to the right hand to unload,
change magazines, etc.
b. Serial Number. Before firing a service pistol, the
serial numbers on the main component parts (slide
frame and barrel) should be checked to ensure that
the serial numbers are identical. Components with
identical numbers indicate that headspacing for that
service pistol is correct. If the numbers do not
match, the weapon should not be fired unless it is
certified as safe in writing by a weapon technician,
who will list the serial numbers of each component.
12. Confirm by Questions.
13. Supervised Safety Precaution Drill. The instructor will
prove the weapon in the supervised safety precaution drill. The
proving will be conducted at the start and finish of each training lesson
and at the termination of each serial of the range practice. The class
instructor is responsible for proving all pistols and drill ammunition
safe prior to use in the lesson.
B-GL-385-003/PT-001 9
9mm Pistol
14. For Inspection Clear Weapons. Explain and demonstrate.
On the Command “FOR INSPECTION CLEAR WEAPONS”, the
shooter will carry out the following actions:
a. Adopt the load position:
(1) open the flap of the holster with the left
hand, take a firm grasp on the pistol grip
with the right hand, and draw the pistol
from the holster;
(2) point the muzzle parallel to the ground in
front of and in line with the right shoulder;
and
(3) position the forefinger so that it is outside
the trigger guard, while at the same time
gripping the pistol grip with the thumb and
remaining fingers (Figure 2-1 load
position).
Figure 2-1: Load Position
10 B-GL-385-003/PT-001
Lesson Plans—Basic Skills
b. The shooter should then depress the magazine catch
with the thumb of the right hand, remove the
magazine and place it in the pistol compartment of
the holster.
c. The shooter should then place the left hand over the
rear of the slide and grip it so that the thumb is on
the left side of the slide; he should pull the slide
fully to the rear and, with the thumb of the right
hand, push the rear of the slide locking lever into the
notch on the slide (to accomplish this, a slight
adjustment of the right hand may be required).
d. All magazines should be removed from the holster
and held in the left hand with the magazine
platforms clearly visible immediately above the
ejection opening.
Figure 2-2: Prepare for Inspection
B-GL-385-003/PT-001 11
9mm Pistol
15. Instructor. The instructor will prove all weapons safe by
conducting a visual inspection of all pistols and magazines.
NOTE
The instructor's own pistol must also be proved safe by a
member of the class.
16. Returning the Pistol. When the pistols have been inspected,
the instructor will order "CLEAR." On this command the individual
will return the pistol to the holster as follows:
a. place one of the empty magazines in the fingers of
the right hand and return the other to the holster
magazine container;
b. take the magazine from the finger of the right hand
and hold it in the left hand;
c. depress the slide locking lever with the thumb of the
right hand allowing the slide to go forward;
d. insert an empty magazine into the pistol and squeeze
the trigger while pointing the pistol at the target
area;
e. raise the holster flat with the free hand and return the
pistol to the holster;
f. secure the holster flap; and
g. check dummy ammunition.
17. Confirm by Practice.
18. Safety precautions are to be carried out at the following
times:
a. before and after instruction;
12 B-GL-385-003/PT-001
Lesson Plans—Basic Skills
b. before stripping;
c. during issue and return to stores;
d. before and after range practices; and
e. when the safety status of the weapon in doubt.
19. Confirm by Practice.
20. Proving Safe. The pistol will always be proved safe by
physically showing the receiving soldier that the chamber is clear
when given to or accepted from someone, or by checking the chamber
whenever the pistol is handled (except for the immediate purpose of
firing).
21. Confirm by Practice.
22. Conclusion:
a. take questions from the class on the entire lesson;
b. confirm by questions and practice;
c. conduct safety precautions; and
d. pack kit.
23. Summary. To include the following:
a. the need to carry out safety precautions and
performing them correctly; and
b. a forecast of the next lesson in this subject.
LESSON 2
STRIPPING, ASSEMBLING AND CLEANING
INSTRUCTOR NOTES
24. Aim. To teach:
B-GL-385-003/PT-001 13
9mm Pistol
a. stripping;
b. assembling;
c. test after assembly;
d. stripping and assembling the magazine; and
e. cleaning.
25. Time. One 40 minute period.
26. Method. A basic instructional period.
27. Stores:
a. pistol—1 per soldier;
b. web belt—1 per soldier;
c. magazine—2 per weapon; and
d. flannelette swabs and oil—as required.
CONDUCT OF THE LESSON
28. Safety Precautions. Normal.
29. Review. Safety precautions and characteristics.
30. Introduction. The pistol is an excellent weapon for shooting
at close quarters. Its short barrel enables the soldier to engage targets
quickly. It is important that the soldier knows how to maintain the
pistol and how to handle it without endangering the lives of his
comrades.
31. Stripping. Explain and demonstrate. Emphasize the need to
lay out the parts in a logical sequence and the fact that excessive
stripping causes wear and leads to breakdowns. The correct sequence
is as follows:
14 B-GL-385-003/PT-001
Lesson Plans—Basic Skills
NOTE
There is no need to return the magazine or squeeze the
trigger.
a. carry out safety precautions;
b. draw the slide fully to the rear, push the safety catch
upward and engage it in the forward recess of the
slide, thus holding the slide to the rear;
c. push upward on the rear of the slide locking lever; at
the same time, press inward on that part of the slide
locking lever axis pin that protrudes above the
trigger on the right side of the pistol;
d. hold the slide with the left hand;
e. disengage the safety catch and ease the slide forward
off the pistol body under control; and
f. disengage and remove the main spring and guide,
grasp the cam projection and lift the rear of the
barrel as far as it will go. Withdraw the barrel to the
rear and remove it from the slide.
Figure 2-3: Pistol Stripped
B-GL-385-003/PT-001 15
9mm Pistol
32. Assembly. Explain and demonstrate. The correct sequence
for the assembly of the service pistol is as follows:
a. check serial numbers on the slide frame and barrel to
ensure they are identical;
b. insert the barrel in the slide to engage the barrel
locking lug in the lug recess;
c. position the main spring and guide in the slide;
NOTES
1. Place the loop of the guide into the seating in the
cam projection so that the retaining ball is furthest from the
barrel
2. If the guide is seated upside down the portion of
the guide surrounding the retaining ball will not be in line
with the cam projection.
d. place the assembled slide on the guideway of the
body, push the slide fully to the rear and secure it
with the safety catch;
e. insert the slide locking lever in the axis hole on the
pistol body and push it until it locks into position;
ensure the rear of the slide locking lever is down;
f. hold the slide to the rear with the left hand, release
the safety catch with the right thumb and ease the
slide forward under control; and
g. insert an empty magazine into the pistol and squeeze
the trigger.
33. Confirmation. By practice.
16 B-GL-385-003/PT-001
Lesson Plans—Basic Skills
34. Test After Assembly. The pistol should be tested
immediately after assembly to ensure that it works properly.
Malfunctions should be repaired by a weapons technician. The
following tests should be conducted:
a. Safety Catch. With the magazine in place, cock the
hammer and apply the safety catch. Press and
release the trigger. Release the safety catch. If the
hammer rotates forward when the safety catch is
released, the safety catch or sear (or both) is
defective. Operate the trigger.
b. Half Bent:
(1) draw the hammer back until the sear
engages the half bent. The hammer is now
at half cock. Squeeze the trigger. If the
hammer is released, the sear and hammer
are defective; and
(2) draw the hammer back almost to the full-
cock position and release it. It should fall
only to the half cock. If it falls fully
forward, the weapon is unsafe for firing.
c. Magazine. Remove the magazine and rotate the
hammer to the full-cock position. Press and release
the trigger. If the hammer rotates forward, the
trigger group tripping lever or the sear connecting
arm is defective.
NOTE
If any failures of the safety devices are encountered during
the test after assembly, the weapon must be repaired by a
weapon technician.
35. Confirm by Practice.
B-GL-385-003/PT-001 17
9mm Pistol
36. Stripping and Assembly of the Magazine. Explain and
demonstrate the following:
a. Lift the tab on the base of the magazine, keeping the
thumb in position to prevent the spring from
jumping out; slide the base off the magazine
housing.
b. Remove the magazine spring and platform.
c. Assemble in reverse order, ensuring that the
magazine platform is positioned properly—when the
magazine is in the weapon, the raised portion of the
platform is to the left.
d. Excessive or forceful stripping may result in an ill-
fitting base, a weakened spring or a jammed
platform.
37. Confirm by Practice.
38. Cleaning. Explain and demonstrate as necessary.
a. Material. A cleaning rod, flannelette (100 mm x
50 mm) and a small brush are needed to properly
clean the pistol. A dry clean place to work is also
necessary.
18 B-GL-385-003/PT-001
Lesson Plans—Basic Skills
Figure 2-4: Cleaning Kit
b. Normal Cleaning. The following procedure is used
for normal cleaning of the weapon:
(1) strip the pistol;
(2) clean the barrel and chamber with the
cleaning rod and dry flannelette;
(3) using a dry flannelette and brush,
thoroughly clean the remainder of the pistol
by removing all dirt and moisture;
(4) clean the magazines (they need not be
stripped regularly unless interiors are wet
or dirty);
(5) lightly oil the barrel and chamber using the
cleaning rod and oily flannelette;
B-GL-385-003/PT-001 19
9mm Pistol
(6) lightly oil the remainder of the pistol
interior and the magazines;
(7) assemble the pistol and work the slide
several times to distribute the oil; and
(8) test after assembly.
39. Cleaning Before Firing. Strip the pistol. The interior of the
barrel, the face of the cartridge seat in the chamber and the magazine
platform must be cleaned of all oil. Assemble and test the pistol.
40. Cleaning After Firing. Strip the pistol. Remove all carbon
and fouling, paying particularly attention to the barrel and chamber.
Carry out normal cleaning. Assemble and test the pistol.
41. Adapting Cleaning Methods to Climate (Cleaning in
adverse conditions). Different cleaning methods are needed for
different climates. The appropriate procedures for the various climates
are outlined below:
a. Temperate Climate. Normal daily cleaning of the
pistol is adequate where extremes of temperature
and humidity are not encountered.
b. Cold Climate. Normal daily cleaning is required
and a special temperature water displacing oil is to
be used.
c. Wet Climate. Normal daily cleaning plus a
generous application of oil to counter rust is


Use: 0.0278